Venezuela Generals Tap Businessman to Lead; Fall of Chavez Means Castro Gets No More Oil

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 13, 2002 | Go to article overview

Venezuela Generals Tap Businessman to Lead; Fall of Chavez Means Castro Gets No More Oil


Byline: David R. Sands, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Fidel Castro was snubbed and U.S. motorists caught a break as governments across the hemisphere scrambled yesterday to assess the stunning fall of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, the left-wing populist ousted under military pressure Thursday after weeks of social unrest.

The new manager of state-owned Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) declared that the ex-president's policy of cultivating ties with Cuba's strongman through subsidized energy trade had been revoked.

"We're not going to send a single barrel more of oil to Cuba," Edgar Paredes, head of sales and refining at the oil giant told cheering PDVSA workers.

Venezuela under Mr. Chavez had become Cuba's largest trading partner and leading diplomatic ally on the continent, shipping up to 53,000 barrels of cut-rate oil to Cuba each day.

Meanwhile, the price of crude oil staged its biggest drop in five months, falling 6.1 percent to $23.47 a barrel in New York after PDVSA workers moved to bring production and exports to full capacity.

Monopoly executive Horacio Medina estimated that operations will be back to normal within a week.

Since the South American nation supplies 13 percent of oil consumed by the United States, analysts predicted pump prices could fall as much as 10 cents in the next month.

Public reaction from many of Venezuela's neighbors was muted, despite the fact that Mr. Chavez had been repeatedly accused of cultivating ties to Marxist insurgency groups in countries such as Colombia and Peru.

Private relief at seeing Mr. Chavez go was tempered by concerns about instability in Caracas and unease about the process that removed a democratically elected leader.

"It's worrying, but we already know that in a deeply divided country, democracy falls apart," said Peru's president, Alejandro Toledo, speaking to reporters at a summit of 19 Central and South American countries in Costa Rica.

In a carefully worded statement, the Latin American leaders "condemned the interruption of constitutional order" in Venezuela, but stopped far short of calling for Mr. Chavez's restoration to power.

Both Peru and Mexico announced they would delay formal recognition of the new government in Caracas as it prepared for a promised round of elections.

"Coups do not help anyone," said Argentina President Eduardo Duhalde.

The Bush administration has made its unhappiness with Mr. Chavez increasingly clear in recent months, citing his confrontational governing style, his embrace of Cuba and his ties to fellow Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries members Libya and Iraq.

Mr. Chavez infuriated U.S. officials in October when he held up a photograph of dead Afghan children and said the U.S.-led military campaign in Afghanistan must halt what he called "the slaughter of innocents."

He also slammed the U.S. role in the fight against narcotics traffickers in neighboring Colombia, amid continuing reports that Venezuela had established its own ties to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the largest leftist rebel group fighting the Colombian government. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Venezuela Generals Tap Businessman to Lead; Fall of Chavez Means Castro Gets No More Oil
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.