A GREAT NATION BETRAYED; in the Last of His Pungent Essays on the Decline of Our Country, a Much-Loved Novelist Warns That Britain's Very Survival Is at Risk from the Forces of Euro Tyranny

By Fraser, George Macdonald | Daily Mail (London), April 17, 2002 | Go to article overview

A GREAT NATION BETRAYED; in the Last of His Pungent Essays on the Decline of Our Country, a Much-Loved Novelist Warns That Britain's Very Survival Is at Risk from the Forces of Euro Tyranny


Fraser, George Macdonald, Daily Mail (London)


Byline: GEORGE MACDONALD FRASER

AS THE author of the Flashman novels, George MacDonald Fraser has become one of Britain's best-loved writers. In his new memoirs, he draws on his extensive knowledge of history and deep love of this country to launch a rousing attack on the follies of the modern world. Here, in the final part of an exclusive Daily Mail serialisation, he turns his fire on Europe. . .

SUPPOSE that in 1945, with the Nazi war machine smashed and Britain rejoicing after the greatest victory in her history, we had been told: 'Of course, 50 years hence your leaders will have surrendered your sovereignty to the people you've just defeated and those you've liberated.

'In effect they will be your masters, your lawmakers - oh, and incidentally, it will be a crime to sell goods in pounds and ounces. . .' The prophet would have been ridiculed, perhaps even reviled as a traitor, and probably put in a padded cell.

Well, it has happened.

Since 1972, when the country was dragooned into the Common Market by Edward Heath, successive governments, with a cynical disregard for public opinion, have squandered countless millions for the benefit of the sponger nations of the EU.

In return our farming and fishing industries have been brought to the brink of ruin, our constitution undermined, and our laws, passed by properly elected Britons, brushed aside whenever they are at odds with the directives of unelected foreign bureaucrats whose corruption is a byword, in whose appointment we had no say, but whose will is sovereign while ours goes for nothing.

Worse still, our leaders have been criminally stupid in embracing, and enshrining in our law, the wicked and misguided twaddle of European 'human rights', submitting to the ruling of that unqualified kangaroo assembly, the European Court, and using all this farrago of Continental nonsense as an excuse for destroying the fabric of our nation.

'We have to do it because Brussels says we must.' How often have we heard this pathetic whine from a gutless government.

Is it not remarkable that Britain, with a record on human rights superior to any other nation's, Britain, which has done more to spread honest law and democracy than all the European states together, Britain, whose ideas and ideals have been adopted by every respectable people on earth, should be lectured on 'human rights' by the Continent?

A Continent which gave us the Holocaust, the Inquisition, the French Revolution and subsequent horrors of Napoleonic aggression, the police state, fascism, communism, and other benefits too numerous to mention - to say nothing of being so wicked, corrupt and feeble that within living memory it had to be rescued by Britain, America and Russia?

Brazen impudence is too mild a

phrase for the effrontery of the European Court in issuing its diktats to us, and all the epithets of cowardice are insufficient to describe the British governments of both parties who have been so craven and witless as to accept them.

I am ranting, no doubt about it. But then I am enraged at what has been done to my country by the contemptible dross elected to Westminster in evil hours, worst of all the Heath government, which gave Britain its death blow, and New Labour, who have trampled on the corpse.

BUT NOT half so angry, I dare swear, as our forefathers would be if they could see the betrayal, by worthless politicians, of the country they worked so hard to build and the surrender of the precious freedoms won by better men at Gravelines and Trafalgar and Waterloo and Flanders and Alamein and in the skies above Kent.

'Oh, emotive drum-beating!' I can hear the belittlers cry. 'Jingoism of the NATION BETRAYED most Victorian kind, a bellow from a bygone age!' That is how they see their country's past, and are too stupid and complacent to look to its future.

But even they would do well to ask themselves what Churchill and the first Elizabeth and Chatham and William Wallace and the Unknown Soldier (yes, and Washington and Jefferson and Lincoln) would have thought of the pass to which Britain has been brought in the past half-century. …

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