I've Been Vilified by My Fellow Jews for Condemning Israel,but I Won't Bow to Political Correctness

By Kaufman, Gerald | The Evening Standard (London, England), April 19, 2002 | Go to article overview

I've Been Vilified by My Fellow Jews for Condemning Israel,but I Won't Bow to Political Correctness


Kaufman, Gerald, The Evening Standard (London, England)


Byline: GERALD KAUFMAN

IHAVE a high regard for Dr Jonathan Sacks, the Chief Rabbi, and value our cordial personal relationship.

I hope that relationship will not be disrupted by my disagreement with a thesis he seemed to be advancing on BBC radio this week. The Chief Rabbi appeared to be linking criticism of the policies of the Israeli government with the challenging of "Israel's very right to exist" and "a certain whipping-up of anti-Semitism in this country".

The conclusion that could be drawn from his remarks was that rejection of the policies of the current Israeli government towards the Palestinians is a cover for anti-Semitism.

I know anti-Semitism when I see or hear it - and, believe me, I have experienced quite a lot of it.

When I was a Jewish scholarship boy at Leeds Grammar School in the Forties, that overwhelmingly gentile institution was riddled with anti-Semitism, among both the pupils and the staff. I couldn't wait to leave the school, and never go back.

In Parliament, when I first was elected in the Seventies, I was abused verbally by a man called Sir Charles Taylor, Tory MP for Eastbourne, who after a debate in which I defended the state of Israel, told me to go back to where I came from; he did not mean Leeds, where I was born, but specified Tel Aviv. Since

then, I have faced little overt anti-Semitism, though I know that it exists as a substratum in British society, and should neither be ignored nor underestimated.

It is very easy for individuals who are members of ethnic or religious minorities to delude and/or comfort themselves into believing that personal antipathy towards them, or problems they encounter, are due to their religion, or the colour of their skin.

I have a constituent who ascribes all her problems to the fact that she is black and being discriminated against. Her problems have nothing whatever to do with her being black, but to the fact that she is a difficult person to deal with.

And that, at a more generalised level, is the situation with the Israeli government today. Far from being criticised because it rules a Jewish state, it is to a large extent being insulated from criticism because it rules a Jewish state.

While there will always be some undercurrent of anti-Semitism towards Israel because it was established by Jews, all-pervasive political correctness often impedes criticism of Israel in case it is interpreted as anti-Semitism.

Memories of the Holocaust rightly haunt Western societies and to some degree have protected Israeli government policies from criticism which is justified.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

I've Been Vilified by My Fellow Jews for Condemning Israel,but I Won't Bow to Political Correctness
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.