Setting Up a Student Internship with a University

By Henry, Eleanor G. | The National Public Accountant, April 2002 | Go to article overview

Setting Up a Student Internship with a University


Henry, Eleanor G., The National Public Accountant


Most internships are work-based, cooperative educational experiences among academic programs, students, and employers. Internships provide real world experience for students in academic programs and give them an edge in terms of relevant experience and confidence during the job search. Students have an opportunity to explore different career options, establish networking relationships, acquire new skills, and apply classroom knowledge to actual work situations.

Academic programs benefit from blending classroom instruction with practical training. From a public relations point of view, schools can use internships to enhance recruitment, student retention and fundraising efforts in addition to building relationships with employers.

Employers benefit from tapping into a pool of fresh talent and identifying the best prospects for future hiring. Student interns may be more motivated than part-time workers because they are preparing for careers and building a list of references. Other internship advantages involve specialized assistance for short-term projects, extra help for regular staff, and assistance requiring special skills or knowledge such as computer software, graphics, language, or public relations. Internships may expose supervisory staff to new methods and concepts and reduce the cost of the organization's workforce. Indirect benefits include a direct link to a particular college or school and an opportunity for the employer to influence an educational program through internship feedback.

Most internships are offered during a semester or summer for academic credit. The number of credit hours is related to the number of hours worked. Credit hours commonly range between two and twelve semester hours of credit, with approximately 40 hours of work required for each hour of academic credit. Companies can initiate an internship relationship with a nearby college or university. However, advance planning helps to ensure a successful internship.

* Write a Job Description for the Intern.

Include the employing organization's name, location, website address, name of contact and preferred mode of reply. Students find it convenient to reply by email and attach an electronic file. State the title and number of positions anticipated, time period, approximate work hours per week, a list of the tasks to be performed, and the pay rate. If a special background is required for the internship, list specific courses or experiences expected of the intern.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Setting Up a Student Internship with a University
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.