2002-2003 MTNA Student Competitions

American Music Teacher, April-May 2002 | Go to article overview

2002-2003 MTNA Student Competitions


Rules, Requirements, Official Application Forms Linda Stump, Director of Competitions

COMPOSITION COMPETITIONS

The intent of the composition competition sponsored by Music Teachers National Association is to encourage creativity and self-expression in student musicians through the art of composing and to recognize their achievements, as well as the significant work of their teachers.

MTNA Student Composition Competitions Sponsored by: Warner Bros. Publications, Inc. The MTNA FOUNDATION

PERFORMANCE COMPETITIONS

The intent of the performance competitions sponsored by Music Teachers National Association is to encourage exceptionally talented young artists in the pursuit of musical excellence and to recognize outstanding achievement in the music teaching profession.

MTNA Junior High School Performance Competitions Sponsored by: Baldwin Piano Company, sponsor of the piano competition The Selmer Company, sponsor of the brass competition The MTNA FOUNDATION, sponsor of the string and woodwind competitions

MTNA High School Performance Competitions Sponsored by: Yamaha Corp. of America, Piano Division, sponsor of the piano competition The MTNA FOUNDATION, sponsor of the brass, string, voice and woodwind competitions

MTNA Collegiate Artist Performance Competitions Sponsored by: Gibson Musical Instruments, sponsor of the guitar competition Steinway & Sons, sponsor of the piano competition The MTNA FOUNDATION, sponsor of the brass, organ, string, voice and woodwind competitions

MTNA Collegiate Chamber Music Performance Competition Sponsored by: Allen I. McHose Scholarship Fund

Rules and and Procedures Applicable to All MTNA Student Competitions

New This Year!

* There is no longer a Teacher Entry Fee for MTNA members.

* Nonmember teachers must pay a $150 Teacher Entry Fee and complete and submit a teacher entry form. (See page 44.)

* Repertoire revision proposals will be accepted for all levels between the state and division competitions only.

* Recordings are no longer required for the Composition Competitions.

The MTNA Student Competitions consist of three levels: state competition, division competition, national finals.

The application deadline for all states is September 9, 2002. All mailed applications must be postmarked or time/date stamped on or before September 9, 2002. Applications postmarked after the deadline will not be accepted.

All entry fees are nonrefundable

An MTNA-affiliated state association may not have competition rules that differ from the MTNA Student Competition rules.

Performance Competitions Junior High Performance

* Entry Fee: $70

* Age: 11-15

* Grades: 7-9

* Competitions: Brass, Piano, String, Woodwind

High School Performance

* Entry Fee: $100

* Age: 14-19

* Grades: 10-12

* Competitions: Brass, Piano, String, Voice, Woodwind

Collegiate Artist Performance

* Entry Fee: $100

* Age: not yet 27 as of March 18, 2003

* Competitions: Brass, Guitar, Organ, Piano, String, Voice, Woodwind

Chamber Music Performance

* Entry Fee: $100

* Age: not yet 27 as of March 18, 2003

* Ensemble size: 3-6 players

* Ensemble instrumentation: any combination of brass, guitar, piano, string and wind instruments. Ensembles of three (3) or more pianists are not permitted.

The national finals of the competitions are scheduled for March 15-19, 2003, in Salt Lake City, Utah. For a complete list of state and division competition dates and locations, consult the June/July 2002 issue of American Music Teacher or the MTNA website at www.mtna.org

Teacher Eligibility

* Teachers may enter in competitions only students who are currently studying that instrument, voice or composition with them. …

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