Le Pen or le Sword? Xenophobia Unsheathed in Europe.(OPED)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 1, 2002 | Go to article overview

Le Pen or le Sword? Xenophobia Unsheathed in Europe.(OPED)


Byline: Helle Dale, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

STOCKHOLM. - You see the mote in your neighbor's eye, the Bible says, but not the beam in your own. Motes and beams are brought to mind by the stunned shock and horror that beset Europe last week, following the election results in France. How could the far-right come to such prominence again, Europeans were asking themselves. Surely racism is an evil that besets others - Americans and Israelis, for instance, possibly even benighted people from the Balkans - but enlightened modern-day Europeans?

Frankly, this would be a good time for some people to climb down from their high horses and do a little soul-searching. Yet, viewing the events in France from the vantage point of the conference on racism in Stockholm April 23-24, "Truth, Justice and Reconciliation," you have to wonder.

Uniquely well-timed as the conference was, it barely touched on the problems growing on the European continent. From Rwanda to Cambodia to South Africa to Bosnia to Polish-German reconciliation after World War II, the focus of this well-intentioned exercise was firmly elsewhere, or at least firmly in the past. Granted Swedish Prime Minister Goeran Persson made a brief general comment in his opening remarks that "recent events in Europe show the importance of this." With the recent shocking instances of the burning of synagogues in France and inflamed tempers over immigration levels in a number of European countries, there would have been much material to be gathered from the here and now.

The immediate question should have been whether Europe can be reconciled to the levels of immigrants living in its midst - France itself now has 4 million to 5 million Muslims - enticed there by earlier times' generous immigration and asylum laws, welfare provisions and promises of low-skilled jobs. Signs are not promising, one would have to say. Paradoxically, however, the greater the level of support for xenophobic European political parties, the greater also the fury sparked by the Middle East crisis and charges of racism and human rights abuses leveled at Israel. It is as though taking up the cause of Palestinians serves for Europeans to establish a set of humanitarian credentials. For some, of course, it may simply mask a latent anti-Semitism.

The political event that sparked these thoughts is the French presidential election. After years in the disreputable shadows of French politics, Jean-Marie Le Pen, leader of the far-right National Front, came in second in the first round of the French presidential election. He knocked Socialist Prime Minister Lionel Jospin out of contention, causing the latter's mortified resignation from politics altogether. Mr. Le Pen now stands as the sole challenger to President Jacques Chirac, which leaves at least the theoretical possibility, however remote, that Mr. …

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