Terrorists and Greek Choruses; Arafat Is No Achilles.(OPED)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 3, 2002 | Go to article overview

Terrorists and Greek Choruses; Arafat Is No Achilles.(OPED)


Byline: Jackie Mason and Raoul Felder, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Greek chorus in Agamemnon chants in the background, "Good, Prevail, Prevail." Unfortunately, life is not a Greek chorus, particularly if it involves Muslim terrorists.

Recently, President Bush reiterated what he had said in September: " . . . if you harbor a terrorist, you're just as guilty as the terrorist. If you feed one or hide one, you're just as guilty as those who came and murdered thousands of innocent Americans."

The president absolutely, positively meant what he said - unless you were talking to him about Yasser Arafat. Mr. Arafat is still treated by us as the head of state for 3.3 million Palestinians. Back in the real world, he has been only the ruler of Ramallah. Sitting in the rubble like a fermenting piece of rotten cabbage, he was for months unable to send out for a pizza. However, he was still able to direct, or at least condone, children becoming suicide bombers or ordering up a shipload of arms and explosives.

Searching for terrorists, we have developed a bad case of myopia where Mr. Arafat is concerned. The reason, of course, is Arab oil, and the perception that when we launch our attack against Iraq we will need Arab support. We believe the absolute reverse to be true.

Before sending Secretary of State Colin Powell off on his mission to the Middle East, Mr. Bush said, "This is a conflict that can widen or an opportunity we can seize." He was so right, but he was referring to the wrong thing. We have now a unique opportunity to forever end Arab ability to use their control of oil as a weapon of blackmail against the West.

At the same time, we can also send the Arabs a message that we understand at least part of their thinking. They have no great love for the Palestinians, having kicked them out of Arab countries whenever the opportunity arose. But, since they do not want us to go to war against fellow Arab Saddam Hussein, as long as the cauldron keeps bubbling between the Israelis and the Palestinians, they believe Saddam is safe. So far they have been right.

We have the ability to do what has to be done in Iraq on our own. Mission accomplished, Mr. Arafat will truly be irrelevant. Events can then be viewed in a realistic perspective.

Some facts are clear, and these realities should drive our policies in the region. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Terrorists and Greek Choruses; Arafat Is No Achilles.(OPED)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.