The Interface of Teacher Education with the Global Issue of Peace; Educators Speak (Conclusion).(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)

Manila Bulletin, May 11, 2002 | Go to article overview

The Interface of Teacher Education with the Global Issue of Peace; Educators Speak (Conclusion).(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)


Byline: Amelou Benitez Reyes,Ph D.

Peace education at PWU

WHEN Peace Education was introduced at PWU, Quezon City campus, two strategies were implemented. The first strategy was the integration of peace concepts in the different subjects such as Psychology, History, Sociology, Economics, etc. Faculty members were asked to come up with course outlines integrating concepts of peace wherever it was necessary. Reading materials were sourced out to furnish teachers with the content for subject integration, for example, "Peace Initiatives of the Philippine Government" and materials from the UN Disarmament Committee and Peace. Students and teachers also used economic journals.. Symposia were held to help teachers come up with modules like "Arms Reduction and Disarmament," "Conflict Negotiation/Management" and the like.

To institutionalize Peace Studies, a curriculum was prepared for the Bachelor of Arts major in International Studies on Peace and Development, which was subsequently approved in 1994 by the University President and the Commission on Higher Education (CHED). The curriculum included different subjects in government, economics, the peace process, arms and disarmament, conflict management, research methodology, and historiography. Aside from the degree program, students of other degree program could take up an elective subject on "Introduction to Peace Studies."

PWU also implements a working peace concept from the pre-school level through elementary, secondary, tertiary, and on to the Graduate School.

At our Elementary and Secondary Schools, we have embarked on classroom and school activities that help promote Peace Building and Earth Stewardship. Among them are:

* Organizing a school recycling program, an essay contest with Peace Buiding themes:

* Writing letters to local officials, lobbying on bills that affect peace building, e.g., gun control, war toys, billboards depicting violence, etc.;

* Involving/inviting parents, enriching PTA activities to support peace education events;

* Undertaking field trips, reviewing and evaluating films and movies to determine value content;

* Participating in intra and interschool sports, peace concerts, peace vigils, peace parade, environmental projects, literary and arts contests;

* Undertaking community events in solidarity with other civil society groups, and developing a peace and environmental policy for the school.

Peace education aims to educate children and adults in the dynamics of conflict, and to promote peacemaking skills in homes, schools and communities.

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