OPINION: Awards Ceremonies and Client Surveys Take a Lot of Believing

Marketing, May 9, 2002 | Go to article overview

OPINION: Awards Ceremonies and Client Surveys Take a Lot of Believing


A very odd thing happened in the past week or so. There was the Montreux Golden Rose Festival where the Brits swept the board in the entertainment stakes - not just the BBC or ITV, but Channel 4 as well.

The only party pooper was Channel 5. Perhaps the channel's entertainment is too sophisticated to be generally appreciated across Europe. Or maybe it's a question of trying just that little bit harder when it gets Bertelsmann to release some more funds.

But you would have to say the overall performance was a tribute to creativity in the British television industry.

Yet a few days earlier out popped a report proving that the UK's programme-makers are so incompetent that they are boring viewers rigid; and that 50% of them found the last programme they watched so unmemorable that they could scarcely remember what it was.

How can you possibly reconcile the two things? Do the ungrateful viewers need to be shown some Swedish, German or Swiss entertainment to make them have a better appreciation of when they are well off?

The apparent dichotomy is, of course, a false one. There are dodgy awards ceremonies and there are equally strange surveys of public opinion.

The fact that British programmes took exactly two-thirds of the awards at Montreux does not mean that British programmes are at least 66% better than anyone else's. Even such an august body as the Royal Television Society failed to mark the obvious quality of The Blue Planet, just as the Sony's ignored the ground-breaking BBC Voices of Britain project for 2000. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

OPINION: Awards Ceremonies and Client Surveys Take a Lot of Believing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.