The New fascism.(COMMENTARY)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 16, 2002 | Go to article overview

The New fascism.(COMMENTARY)


Byline: Richard W. Rahn, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Chances are we will be less free in the coming years because of a rising statist authoritarianism primarily emanating from Europe.

The increasing assault on financial privacy is an example of this new threat to individual liberties. Financial privacy, a fundamental liberty necessary for individuals to protect themselves from corrupt or despotic governments, kidnappers and other assorted criminals, is increasingly attacked by the European Union, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the United Nations and even elements of the U.S. government.

Proposals from these organizations would limit or eliminate all financial privacy. One of the most odious of these is a proposal by the United Nations to create an International Tax Organization that would require the U.S. government to share detailed personal and business financial information on U.S. citizens and others with U.N. member governments, no matter how corrupt. As a result, our Fourth and Fifth Amendment protections would be stripped away.

Furthermore, this information could end up in the wrong hands, putting our lives and fortunes at risk.

The classical liberal (in the European sense) believes in small government, low taxes, and a minimum of government regulation, coupled with a stable currency (traditionally by the gold standard) and a strong commitment to the rule of law and individual liberty. In the U.S. this is known as free-market conservatism or libertarianism. The father of modern economics, Adam Smith (1723-90), was a classical liberal, as were the Founders of the American Republic. The world is moving away from classical liberalism and traditional socialism, toward a new fascism.

Until World War I, classical liberalism was the dominant political ideology in Western countries. The trauma of the War shook people's faith in existing political order and institutions, particularly in Europe. Russia, just emerging from feudalism, was seized by the communists. Socialists and fascists began to acquire political power. The Depression, although caused by poor government fiscal and monetary policy, made people hunger for the stability and order the statists offered. Adolf Hitler's National Socialism (Nazism) was a particularly virulent form of this new statism.

While most of the media and political class refer to communism and socialism as leftist ideologies and Nazism and fascism as ideologies of the far right, these ideologies are merely different forms of statism. Socialists believe in government ownership of all economic entities and land. Fascists realized that government did not have to own enterprises in order to have total power over them. Thus, fascists tend to be extremely authoritarian and comprehensive regulators. Both ideologies are based on the subjugation of individual liberty and free markets by the agents of the state.

The true political and economic dichotomy is statism vs. libertarianism.

Communists, socialists, fascists and welfare state advocates are, to varying degrees, statists. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The New fascism.(COMMENTARY)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.