Cricket: GATT RAPS CRAWLEY.(Sport)

Sunday Mirror (London, England), May 19, 2002 | Go to article overview

Cricket: GATT RAPS CRAWLEY.(Sport)


Byline: ADAM HATHAWAY

FORMER England captain Mike Gatting accused John Crawley of unprofessionalism after the Hampshire man had disastrously run out Alec Stewart at Lord's yesterday.

Crawley, playing his first international for three years, nudged the ball into the offside and set off for a run leaving Stewart plenty to do to make his ground.

The 39-year-old wicketkeeper (right) was stranded as substitute fielder Chandana threw down the stumps to leave England teetering on 214-6 in pursuit of Sri Lanka's mammoth 555-8.

The dismissal ruined the veteran stumper's comeback after taking the winter off to sort out a persistent elbow problem and he trudged back to the pavilion for just seven runs.

Gatting said: "It's nice to keep the scoreboard ticking along and running between the wickets is part of that.

"But it did not look like the call was early enough.

"Alec got to the other end too slowly and the fielder was very lively. …

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