Interrogation: Boy George - Hat's My Boy; after His Comment about Tea Being Better Than Sex, Boy George Is Still as Outrageous as He Looks. Just the Way We like It.(Features)

Sunday Mirror (London, England), May 19, 2002 | Go to article overview

Interrogation: Boy George - Hat's My Boy; after His Comment about Tea Being Better Than Sex, Boy George Is Still as Outrageous as He Looks. Just the Way We like It.(Features)


Byline: Words: Simon Button

This West End show you're in, Taboo, isn't really your first acting job, is it? Boy George: Well, I appeared on The A-Team in the 80s, but I'd hardly call that acting. I was supposed to play myself, but when I got to America they insisted I speak like a Valley Girl. I'd get up every morning, have a huge marijuana spliff and just get through it. It was one of the few things I ever did for money. It was so much money I just can't tell you, and I won't.

It must be weird playing the late designer Leigh Bowery when someone else in the cast is appearing as you?

BG: Not really. You have to be objective about it. Plus, it's not a documentary - it's a colour postcard of the period, a send-up. What's funny is that, as Leigh, I have to say nasty stuff about myself.

Anything you wouldn't do on stage?

BG: I've been having rows with the owners of The Venue, in London, where Taboo is playing. I want to get my arse out, but the theatre is a crypt below a church and the priest isn't too keen. My arse is quite nice, actually.

When you see your life laid out before you is there anything you regret?

BG: I don't really look at it as just my life story, but I don't have any regrets. A lot of the drugs thing was blown out of proportion. Some of the things written about me were ridiculous. They said I had a pounds 800-a-day habit, but it's not physically possible to take that many drugs.

Given all the drugs you did do, do you feel lucky to be alive?

BG: Well, I'm a bit ox-like and I'm still here.

There have been rumours you had a fling with Euan Morton, who plays you in Taboo. True or false?

BG: Absolute rubbish, but I wouldn't mind. It'd give a whole new meaning to the phrase `Go f*** yourself'. There really isn't anybody in the cast I wouldn't shag. Well, maybe not Gemma Craven, but I don't think she'd want to shag me either.

You're getting on a bit (he's 41 next month). Does getting old bother you?

BG: No, growing up I always wanted to be old anyway. I was always in the kitchen listening to the adults. Other people think about my age more than I do. When I turned 40 all my friends were like, `You have to have a huge party', but I just thought, `Whatever'. You're getting older every day and there's nothing you can do about it, but I do think I look good for 40.

After losing so much weight, did you have buy a whole new wardrobe?

BG: In total I lost about 5st, but I'm a bit of a hoarder so suddenly it was like, `Ooh, remember those trousers I used to love wearing? Now they fit me again.'

Does being slimmer get you more, how shall we put it, shags, then?

BG: Yep, but the weird thing with me is I get much more attention in straight clubs than I do in gay clubs. The gay world is much more about having a square jaw and perfect pecs. I tend to get more straight boys saying, `If I was gay I'd sleep with you', but that's probably because I'm attracted to masculine energy. A lot of gay people dread intimacy, but that's the thing that excites me the most. You see programmes like Queer As Folk, which take gay sex as far as you can on TV, but to me it's far more shocking to see two men being romantic and intimate than it is f***ing. …

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Interrogation: Boy George - Hat's My Boy; after His Comment about Tea Being Better Than Sex, Boy George Is Still as Outrageous as He Looks. Just the Way We like It.(Features)
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