PERSONAL PAINT PROFILES What Does Your Color Choice Say about You?

By Allport, Brandy Hilboldt | The Florida Times Union, June 1, 2002 | Go to article overview

PERSONAL PAINT PROFILES What Does Your Color Choice Say about You?


Allport, Brandy Hilboldt, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Brandy Hilboldt Allport, Times-Union staff writer

Pick the perfect hue for that kitchen cabinet, garage door or guest room, and find out what your choice really means. Leatrice Eiseman can tell you. She knows all about true colors, literally. For 25 years, manufacturers, businesses and designers consulted her about best colors for products, packaging, corporate identities and interior and exterior designs.

In Colors for Your Every Mood (Capital Books, $20) Eiseman takes her expertise from the board room to the living room, telling readers which colors evoke feelings of whimsy, nurturing, tradition, romance and tranquility. The book includes examples of 150 color combinations, pointers for choosing a scheme for any place in the home and reportage on psychological research about color.

-- Brandy Hilboldt Allport/staff

PINK: People who prefer pink are soft, tender friends. Romantic and refined, they are upset by violence of any kind.

PURPLE: Purple people are enigmatic, generous and highly creative. They have a quick perception of spiritual ideas. They are easy to live with but hard to know.

BLACK: People who prefer black often have conflicting attitudes. They might be conventional and sophisticated or might like to think of themselves as worldly and serious, very dignified. For them, cleverness, personal security and prestige are important.

ORANGE: Orange lovers are agreeable, gregarious, charming and always looking for a new challenge. Because orange people are fascinated by many things, they can be fickle. The newest friend is often the best friend.

BLUE: Blue people are trusting, cool and confident. They think twice before acting and prefer sticking to a close circle of friends.

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