Eva: Palindromic Chaos in a Cave

By O'Connor, Bill A. | Word Ways, May 2002 | Go to article overview

Eva: Palindromic Chaos in a Cave


O'Connor, Bill A., Word Ways


The dangers attendant on speleology have perhaps not been sufficiently emphasized. In one particularly gruesome incident, a spelunker dived into a cave pool, passed unawares through a subterranean passage, and emerged from the pool into an enclosed grotto. Being unable to find his way back, and with the pool disguising his whereabouts from the search party, he starved to death in the darkness.

A more ordinary danger in caves, however, is the frequent presence of halfwits, psychos, gonzoids, bat-brains, and other assorted maladapts, who will absolutely insist on practicing behaviors which are likely to cause injury, or at least inconvenience, to the serious adventurer.

Therefore, in the interest of alerting cave-stalkers to the hazards that may confront them, I offer here a motley collection of the deplorable activities the spelunker is liable to encounter in the pursuit of his or her hobby. Note to the maladapts: this guide is not intended to furnish examples of recommended conduct.

Six palindromes in the following collection are offered with apologies to Jim Puder, esteemed contributor to Word Ways.

CAVEAT AUDAX

"Eva, can I abut Anita's pose?" Aesop Sat in a tuba in a cave. Eva, can I, a dim rat, arm Ida in a cave? Eva, can I, airy, snide, will away a man on a Maya wall I wed in Syria, in a cave? "Eva, can I, Allen, pull a witness?" I dissent, I wall up Nella in a cave. Eva, can I, Al, let Seward draw Estella in a cave?

Eva, can I ape Pa in a cave? Eva, can I, Cain, a man maddened, damn a maniac in a cave? "Eva, can I bed Lana?" No Nike epic, I tore in! Otto got Toni erotic. I peek in on anal Deb in a cave. Eva, can I damn a fan? I barf on a fan of Rabin, a fan mad in a cave! Eva, can I damn a madness, send a man made in a cave?

"Eva, can Ida, mossy, rage on a canoe?" Gary's so mad in a cave! Eva, can I detail a Terror (Red error), retaliated in a cave? Eva, can I dip a rani in a rapid in a cave? "Eva, can I dip mild Eli?" A wail, Edward. Raw Delia wailed limpid in a cave. Eva, can I dog an idol, probe Dad a deb, or plod in a god in a cave?

"Eva, can I dog a sleepy cat?" Stacy peels a god in a cave. Eva, can I, doge matador Potter, fit? I fret to prod a tame god in a cave! Eva, can I do orbits? "Any day, Alf, I flay a dynast, I brood in a cave." Eva, can I drag Sam or free drab Rog or flee sad Ida's eel-frog or bar deer from Asgard in a cave? Eva, can I draw Nina from a dam or fan inward in a cave?

Eva, can I draw pudenda brooms--I gag, a gismo!--or bad Ned upward in a cave? Eva, can I draw Rae rearward in a cave? Eva, can I drowse on a clay orator, trot a royal canoe sword in a cave? Eva, can I duck a yam or file Eli from a yak-cud in a cave? Eva, can I dump million-one men on oil-limp mud in a cave?

"Eva, can I elope on a cab or barge?" We grab Rob a canoe pole in a cave. Eva, can I erupt on snot or troll or roll or trot on snot, pure in a cave? Eva, can I fist Sir Omar often, no sonnet for amorists, if in a cave? Eva, can a fit a cat on snot--a cat!--if in a cave? Eva, can I gnaw tits? I mail Eli a mist, I twang in a cave!

Eva, can I go date Pisano's son as I pet a dog in a cave? Eva, can I go hail Eli a hog in a cave? Eva, can I, Ina, clap on a more Roman opal? Can I, in a cave? Eva, can Ina map a man in a cave? Eva! Can I, Lee, have Eva heel in a cave?

Eva, can I leer, "Is Asti bromidic?" I dim orbits as I reel in a cave! Eva, can I lie? "Nola has a halo, Neil, in a cave!" Eva, can I, Lisa Byrd, dry Basil in a cave? Eva, can I loop Amadis as I dam a pool in a cave? Eva, can I loot Sam or fly Reba a beryl from a stool in a cave?

Eva, can I, Mel, tell a moth to mallet Lem in a cave? Eva, can Ina cap a rill, or roll? I rap a can in a cave. Eva, can Ina mail Eli a man in a cave? Eva, can Ina maul Lu, a man in a cave? Eva, can I, Naomi, maimed in snide Miami, moan in a cave?

Eva, can Ina, Pam, or Fred, durable, make Red Derek a Melba rudder from a pan in a cave? …

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