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Curia Official Blasts U.S. Media Coverage

By Allen, John L., Jr. | National Catholic Reporter, May 17, 2002 | Go to article overview

Curia Official Blasts U.S. Media Coverage


Allen, John L., Jr., National Catholic Reporter


In the most explosive comments to date on the sex abuse crisis by a senior aide to Pope John Paul II, the Vatican's top canon lawyer has called massive church payouts for clerical misconduct "unwarranted," and criticized a climate of "exaggeration, financial exploitation and nervousness" in the United States.

Archbishop Julian Herranz, head of the Pontifical Council for the Interpretation of Legislative Texts, also complained of a "tenacious, scandalistic style" in the press. Certain media outlets, he suggested, seek to "sully the image of the church and the Catholic priesthood, and to weaken the moral credibility of the magisterium."

Herranz referred to pedophilia as a "concrete form of homosexuality," taking sides in a growing debate about the relationship between homosexuality and clerical sexual misconduct.

In speaking so bluntly, Herranz aired views that are widely held within the Vatican but rarely voiced publicly.

Herranz also criticized proposals to defrock an abuser priest outside the procedures specified in canon law, although Vatican sources told NCR that this should not be taken as a signal of disapproval for the two "special processes" recommended by American participants in a recent Vatican summit.

Herranz, 72, the lone Opus Dei member to head a Vatican office, was one of seven curial officials who participated in the April 2324 summit with the American cardinals. His latest comments came at the Catholic University in Milan April 29, where he lectured on canon law in the life of the church.

In that speech, Herranz devoted nine paragraphs to the American situation. He emphasized that he was speaking personally and did not intend to pass judgment on the summit.

Calling the American crisis a "sad situation," Herranz said, "It has created an unjust climate of suspicion and ambivalence toward priests, on account of a tenacious, scandalistic style, which is not merely informative, in which certain `media' give voice to any charges whatsoever."

Two paragraphs later, Herranz provided the clearest evidence to date that for many policy-makers in the Vatican, homosexuality is among the root causes of clerical pedophilia.

Observing that canon law provides for dismissal from the clerical state for priests who commit certain offenses, Herranz added, "and not solely that concrete form of homosexuality that is pedophilia." He cited canon 1395 of the Code of Canon Law, which refers to "sins against the sixth commandment" by priests.

Herranz also underscored the need to protect the due process rights of all parties to an accusation of misconduct, including the accused priest.

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