Abortion Cutoff

By McCulloch, Heather L. | The Nation, April 9, 1990 | Go to article overview

Abortion Cutoff


McCulloch, Heather L., The Nation


For six years, as population pressures fueled poverty and despair, millions of women in developing countries have been held hostage to U.S. abortion politics. Yet the international dimensions of U.S. policy

ate.

The first World Population Conference, held in 1974, led to an international consensus, strongly supported by the United States, on the link between poverty and overpopulation. In the ensuing decade, government and private family planning programs provided health care and contraceptive advice to millions of women around the world. However, at the second conference, held in Mexico City in 1984, the United States reversed its position, arguing that population growth was a "neutral phenomenon" and that a free-market economy was the solution. In an election-year concession to powerful U.S. antiabortion forces, the so-called Mexico City Policy blocked U.S. assistance to any private foreign clinic that provides abortion services - counseling, referral or education. Actually, no recipient country has ever used U.S. grants to fund abortions. But under the Mexico City Policy any private clinic that turns to alternative funding sources or directs its clients to a government agency faces a cutoff of U.S. aid.

In countries such as Turkey, Bangladesh and India, where overpopulation crises spurred the legalization of abortion, local organizations have been defunded for failure to comply with U.S. regulations. In recent testimony before the House subcommittee on International Operations, Turkiz Gokgol, country representative of The Pathfinder Fund, a U.S.-based family-planning group, described how U.S. policy prevents health care providers from answering a pregnant woman's questions about abortion. Since abortion is legal in Turkey, this puts the health care worker in a position that is unlawful and professionally unethical," he explained. Threats to withhold funds that would provide thousands of patients with preventive contraceptive care unless the provider surrendres his or her medical oath is not an imposition, it is blackmail."

In 1985 the London-based International Planned Parenthood Federation was forced to cut back projects in the Third World. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Abortion Cutoff
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.