Corporate Culture: CMP Media, LLC

By Posnock, Susan Thea | Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management, July 1, 2002 | Go to article overview

Corporate Culture: CMP Media, LLC


Posnock, Susan Thea, Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management


Byline: Susan Thea Posnock

portfolio: The high-tech and healthcare business-to-business media company has nearly 40 magazines including InformationWeek, CRN and Network Computing. Other products include newsletters, Internet products, research, custom publishing and trade shows. Owned by British-based United Business Media, the company has been hit hard by the tech slump, with layoffs - including 30 last month - a major contributor in whittling staff down to about 1,800 from about 2,700 in April 2001.

location: The corporate headquarters are in Manhasset, New York, with other offices in San Francisco, New York City and other locations throughout the country.

word on the company: With all the layoffs and changes over the last few years, it is "collaborate or die," as workers have to do more with less. That has its positive aspects, as the company focuses on "employee empowerment" and doesn't have a real "closed door old boys' network." Employees say there is tremendous interaction among staffs and even different offices. The environment has been changed recently, by more than just the downturn. Since being sold by the Leeds family in 1999, an employee says, "it's kind of morphed from this real close-knit family environment," into one that is "more corporate."

atmosphere: Workers show up in everything from casual to business suits, "as there is no hard and fast dress code." In the Manhasset office, it is all offices and no cubicles. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Corporate Culture: CMP Media, LLC
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.