Bush Reassures GIs on Court; U.S. Soldiers Are Not Subject to International jurisdiction.(NATION)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), July 20, 2002 | Go to article overview

Bush Reassures GIs on Court; U.S. Soldiers Are Not Subject to International jurisdiction.(NATION)


Byline: Bill Sammon, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

FORT DRUM, N.Y. - President Bush yesterday issued his strongest condemnation of the International Criminal Court, vowing never to allow U.S. soldiers to come under its reach.

"We will not submit American troops to prosecutors and judges whose jurisdiction we do not accept," Mr. Bush told thousands of cheering GIs at this sprawling military base.

"Every person who serves under the American flag will answer to his or her own superiors, and to military law, not to the rulings of an unaccountable international criminal court," he added.

Mr. Bush reminded soldiers of the 10th Mountain Division, many of whom served in Afghanistan, they are answerable to American military justice, not the international court that the United Nations began operating in The Hague July 1.

"Our nation expects and enforces the highest standards of honor and conduct in our military," the president said. "That's how you were trained.

"That's what we expect," he added.

The president took a harder line against the court than U.S. diplomats, who last week dropped their demands for permanent immunity for American peacekeeping forces. Instead, the State Department was willing to seek a one-year immunity while entering into side agreements with other nations not to extradite U.S. soldiers and diplomats to The Hague.

Mr. Bush also told the soldiers yesterday that while the global war against terrorism entails sending American advisers to some nations, other places might need conventional forces.

"In some parts of the world, there will be no substitute for direct action by the United States," Mr. Bush said. "That is when we will send you, our military, to win the battles that only you can win."

When he added: "We're prepared for any enemy, any enemy of freedom," a soldier shouted out: "Let's get Saddam." The president smiled wryly at this reference to Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein as the crowd erupted in cheers and wild applause.

They also applauded when Mr. Bush spoke of his desire to spend increased money on U.S. forces. Again and again, the soldiers shouted "Hoo-ah," their all-purpose expression of approval.

"Earlier this year, I proposed the largest increase in military spending since Ronald Reagan was the president," Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bush Reassures GIs on Court; U.S. Soldiers Are Not Subject to International jurisdiction.(NATION)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.