Unlike Clinton, Bush Is Meeting the Threat of Terrorism. (Fair Comment)

By Reiland, Ralph R. | Insight on the News, July 15, 2002 | Go to article overview

Unlike Clinton, Bush Is Meeting the Threat of Terrorism. (Fair Comment)


Reiland, Ralph R., Insight on the News


Like three blind mice, House Majority Leader Dick Gephardt (D-Mo.), Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) and Democratic political strategist James Carville are running around saying they want their eyes opened as to what's going on in this country about terrorism.

Gephardt wants an investigation into "what the White House knew about the events leading up to 9/11, when they knew it and, most importantly, what was done about it." Hillary, who watched submissively from the White House as Islamists attacked America in 1993, 1996,1998 and 2000, suggests that President George W. Bush is asleep at the switch. Carville, echoing Gephardt, asks: "What did the president know, when did he know it and what did he do about it?"

Let's start with the crimes and then "what did he do about it."

The two attacks on the World Trade Center came early in both the Clinton and Bush administrations, as sort of Islamic welcome wagons. With Bill Clinton, it was only 37 days after his first inauguration when the 12:18 p.m. explosion rocked the World Trade Center on Feb. 26, 1993, a blast that blew a crater five stories deep under Tower One. The 1,500-pound fertilizer-based bomb was intended to topple the taller tower of the World Trade Center into its twin tower, killing upward of 40,000 people while simultaneously releasing a cloud of cyanide gas into the sky over Manhattan. Instead, the tower managed to stand and the heat of the explosion incinerated the gas.

Displacing some 6,800 tons of material, the blast killed six people, injured more than 1,000, forced the evacuation of 50,000 and produced $600 million in property damage. It was, at the time, the largest crime scene in New York Police Department history and the most significant act of international terrorism ever committed on U.S. soil.

Similarly, on Sept. 11, 2001, terrorists again struck at the World Trade Center, this time when Bush was less than eight months into his presidency. FBI Director Robert Mueller had been in office one week.

In both cases, in 1993 and prior to Sept. 11, mistakes were made by U.S. intelligence. Many signals were missed and a lot of dots, as they're now saying at the FBI and CIA, were left unconnected. No one disputes this.

What's different about the two World Trade Center attacks are the ways Clinton and Bush reacted. Clinton backed off, seeing the attack as an incident that could best be handled in court, like a McDonald's coffee burn. Bush hit back, seeing a war.

Political adviser Dick Morris provides an insider's view of how Clinton reacted to the massive 1993 explosion--an attack, as noted by Kevin Duffy, the U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Unlike Clinton, Bush Is Meeting the Threat of Terrorism. (Fair Comment)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.