Art Education in Japan: A Textbook-Based Curriculum

By Foster, Mary Sue | School Arts, May 1990 | Go to article overview

Art Education in Japan: A Textbook-Based Curriculum


Foster, Mary Sue, School Arts


Spe-cial (spesh el) adj. 1. Surpassing what is common or usual; exceptional. 2. Distinct among others of a kind.

This dictionary definition sets the tone for the May issue of SchoolArts as we present a selection of articles about notable art teachers, art programs and arts schools. And special doesn't necessarily mean extra funding or special facilities. To nay way of thinking, the term describes individual initiative and a concern for teaching art to students--child or adult--in the most compelling and challenging way possible. Often this means extra effort and time. Occasionally it means working through a difficult situation for minimal reward and acknowledgement. But my experience has been that the returns--even if only in self-fulfilment, inner pride and student response-far exceed the professional time and teaching effort invested.

Since the May issue completes nay first full year as editor, I'd also like to extend the theme to include the 150 plus art teachers/authors who have shared their ideas and photographs on our pages during the 1989-90 publication and academic year. I also would like to express appreciation to those authors with accepted manuscripts resting in our files until the right balance of theme, activity and level makes possible their publication.

Other people are special, too. The staff at our Worcester, Massachusetts office where the editorial content of the magazine receives final shaping and design layout, our advertisers who have made possible the continuing publication of SchoolArts since 1901, and my Advisory Board and Contributing Editors who keep me on course with valued criticism and counsel. Most important of all, of course, is the SchoolArts family of subscribers and readers ... talk about SPECIAL! We know that it isn't every teacher who takes the time to keep abreast of the field and continually seeks ways to improve and extend the way art is taught to students; but we take pride in the growing number of those who do.

Etcetera

One of our expectations for the May issue was to present results and commentary on the survey of art teachers' viewpoints carried in our January issue. …

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