No Barriers to Biking Special Cycles Give Freedom to Disabled

By Baumann, Jim | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 30, 2002 | Go to article overview

No Barriers to Biking Special Cycles Give Freedom to Disabled


Baumann, Jim, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Jim Baumann Daily Herald Tri-Cities Editor

It wasn't just one thing that led Hal Honeyman to expand the family business five years ago.

Sure, he had to find a way to take a bike shop, whose business falls precipitously once summer is over, and make it more of a year-round business.

But then there was Jacob.

Jacob and his two siblings were 4 years old, and Honeyman was looking for a way to put his son, who was born with cerebral palsy, on a bike. He was familiar with the various physical challenges of people with disabilities, so he expanded the business to include cycles made specifically for people with disabilities.

And Creative Mobility was born. It's a subsidiary of the family- owned Bike Rack on St. Charles' far west side, and it features a variety of cycles - mostly grown-up trikes - for people who either don't have the full use of their legs due to conditions like spina bifida or cerebral palsy, or have suffered strokes and have paralysis on one side.

And the business has become a leader in the Midwest.

"They do wonderful work. Otherwise, people wouldn't be able to ride," said Jean Bereza, publicity chairwoman and charter member of the Fox Valley Bicycle and Ski Club. "It gives these people such a great feeling of confidence and pleasure that they can operate something on their own."

That's exactly what Jacob experienced.

"My son can't walk independently," Honeyman said. "The bike is one thing that gives him independence. He can pedal on his own.

"The first time we put him on a bike, he didn't pedal. He liked it, but it was rather passive. The first time he pedaled, the first time he felt that movement, he took off like a wild man. …

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