Research and Education Computer Network Establishes International Link

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Research and Education Computer Network Establishes International Link


Research and Education Computer Network Establishes International Link

Partners in the National Science Foundation Network (NSFNET) have announced the establishment of a new high-speed data communications link between the United States and Europe. For the first time, researchers will have high-speed access to distant super-computers and other high-technology information resources on both sides of the Atlantic.

The NSFNET is the nation's largest research and education computer network. The NSFNET partnership - the National Science Foundation, the Merit Computer Network, IBM Corporation, MCI Communications Corporation, and the state of Michigan - made the U.S. announcement of the new link at the National Net '90 networking conference in Washington, D.C.

IBM, with support from MCI, is sponsoring the new trans-Atlantic service that will enable NSFNET to provide the largest and fastest data communications pipeline connecting researchers and educators on both continents. This new connection will speed the exchange of information in such critical areas as studying global change, mapping the human gene, analyzing particle physics, exploring space and predicting weather.

Using this new link, researchers will be able to exchange information at a rate equivalent to transmitting 50 single-spaced typed pages a second. U.S. and European researchers will be able to collaborate on projects more effectively than ever before. They will be able, for example, to share research data at rapid speeds and to see the same graphic images and text almost simultaneously.

"Access to these kinds of resources, especially at higher speeds, will make it possible for researchers here and in Europe to share technology, information, and expertise in new and important ways," said Stephen S. Wolff, a division director at the National Science Foundation. "It is clear that this kind of collaboration has the potential to speed up the research process and lead us to new scientific breakthroughs that today we cannot even imagine."

Through the NSFNET, U.S. researchers can collaborate though they may work thousands of miles apart. …

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