Depend on It, There's No Humour in Nationalism

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), August 6, 2002 | Go to article overview

Depend on It, There's No Humour in Nationalism


Byline: Ivor WYNNE JONES

KNOWING that North Wales Police solve fewer than a quarter of reported crimes, countless readers have suggested the two officers who went off to London to talk about Anne Robinson could have been better employed.

At goodness knows what cost to the long-suffering North Wales council taxpayers, the policemen were sent to Broadcasting House to interview BBC Director General Greg Dyke under the Race Relations Act 1976.

Working in the shadow of the humourless banner of Welsh nationalism, the police questioned Mr Dyke about the rebroadcast of a dreary Anne Robinson appearance in the Room 101 TV series.

In the offending programme, Miss Robinson said of the Welsh: ``I've never taken to them. What are they for? We can't sing like they can, we can't play rugby like they can and we can't be clever like they are.''

Surely we have all said something similar at different times? The Welsh are constantly making matching remarks about the English. I am one of those who have frequently said the French have never been any good to us as allies.

Judging by the output of TV documentary film-makers, we are still at war with the nasty Germans, much to the annoyance of one of my neighbours who happens to be a German.

Scotsmen are caricatured as parsimonious, the Irish as a bit simple and the Jews as avaricious. …

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Depend on It, There's No Humour in Nationalism
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