Vanishing Vestige of Civil rights.(COMMENTARY)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 8, 2002 | Go to article overview

Vanishing Vestige of Civil rights.(COMMENTARY)


Byline: Paul Craig Roberts, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Does anyone remember what the civil rights movement was about? Not today. Four decades later, it is "controversial" if not "racist" to recall that the civil rights movement was about equal opportunity. People were to be hired on the basis of merit and ability alone - "the best person for the job." No other factor was to play a role.

The ink was hardly dry on the 1964 Civil Rights Act before an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission bureaucrat, Alfred W. Blumrosen, illegally and unconstitutionally subverted the statutory purpose of the law. Judicial complicity and congressional distraction enabled Mr. Blumrosen to redefine discrimination from a purposeful action against an individual to the absence of proportional representation regardless of discriminatory intent.

Thus did Mr. Blumrosen originate the system of race and sex privileges known as quotas that are thoroughly institutionalized throughout the government, private industry and universities. Racial quotas are so firmly entrenched that quotas prevail even in states where federal district courts have ruled against them and referendums have made them illegal.

The 1964 Civil Rights Act has been illegally enforced for 37 years. The result is a massive system of race and sex discrimination against white males in order to achieve proportional representation of racial minorities and women.

Now comes an astonishing report from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management: "Annual Report to Congress, Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program, Fiscal Year 2000," released in April 2002.

This report to Congress makes brutally clear that despite the "equal opportunity" name of the program, the purpose of the federal program is to make certain there is no equal opportunity for whites in federal employment.

The report uses tables and bar charts to make unmistakably clear that federal discrimination against whites goes far beyond merely achieving proportional representation for blacks. In all 22 independent federal agencies and in 16 of 17 federal executive departments, blacks are massively overrepresented.

In the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (sic) blacks make up 46.4 percent of the employees. The "affirmative action" or racial quota target for proportional representation (percent in "Relevant Civilian Labor Force") for the EEOC is 6.4 percent black employees. Blacks are thus overrepresented in EEOC employment by 625 percent.

And the EEOC is the federal agency that is supposed to enforce equal employment opportunity. …

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