Ethics and Politics: Idealistic Political Systems Need Innovative Ethics Systems

By Fleming, Richard Robson | Journal of Power and Ethics, April 2001 | Go to article overview
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Ethics and Politics: Idealistic Political Systems Need Innovative Ethics Systems


Fleming, Richard Robson, Journal of Power and Ethics


Abstract

One of the main weaknesses in most plans to upgrade the condition of humanity through the creation of innovative political systems is that there is usually no innovative "companion" plan to upgrade and maintain the ethical standards of the citizenry to be involved. No political system--no matter how humane in its design and intent--can fulfill its own idealistic promise unless all of its citizens, both on the leadership level and in the rank and file, maintain consistently high standards of ethics. Therefore, the capability to effectively promote high ethical standards on all levels of society is a requirement and not an option for the success of any idealistic political movement. The development of a practical ethics system that satisfies this requirement is a primary objective of the World Culture Network, an international arts and entertainment organization that is being formed to address modern cultural, ethical and social problems.

"If we can't reconcile all opinions then let us unite all hearts."

Author unknown

**********

One of the main weaknesses in most plans to upgrade the condition of humanity through the creation of innovative political systems is that there is usually no innovative "companion" plan to upgrade and maintain the ethical standards of the citizenry to be involved. No political system--no matter how humane in its design and intent--can fulfill its own idealistic promise unless all of its citizens, both on the leadership level and in the rank and file, maintain consistently high standards of ethics. Therefore, the capability to effectively promote high ethical standards on all levels of society is a requirement and not an option for the success of any idealistic political movement.

There are numerous plans under development that are intended to satisfy the political requirements for reaching world peace (or a more stable world with less violence) but very few that are aimed at solving the problems associated with diminishing ethical standards in global society which are an underlying cause of war. The development of a practical ethics system that satisfies this requirement is a primary objective of the World Culture Network.

The World Culture Network is an international arts and entertainment organization that is being formed to address modern cultural, ethical and social problems. It will be composed of autonomous Neighborhood Performance Units that will be placed in virtually all of the major art and entertainment centers around the world. These local performance units will then be unified through the international organization to give them all an extra measure of strength to pursue their community goals with. In time, the Network will also provide an international platform from which cultural, ethical and social issues on the global level can be addressed. This innovative organization is in its final planning stages as of this writing (August 2001)--the first Neighborhood Performance Units are scheduled to be set up in Europe in the spring of 2002.

Two Steps To Addressing Ethics Problem

First, The World Culture Network will address the problems caused by the mass media's materialistic approach to human culture. (The plans for dealing with this problem are too extensive to be explained in this short space and will be detailed in a later article.)

Secondly, it will address the philosophical problems that are due--in part--to the current struggle between the mass media corporations and the established religious institutions over political power. This struggle has become a disaster for world peace efforts on all levels since it has resulted in an unprecedented lowering of "individual" and "group" character on a worldwide basis. For the sake of clarity, let's begin this discussion with a definition of "individual" and "group" character as these terms are being used here and an explanation their role in society.

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