New Cruises through the Soviet Ukraine

Sunset, June 1990 | Go to article overview

New Cruises through the Soviet Ukraine


In the spirit of glasnost, beginning in October, you can--for the first time ever take a cruise ship through the Soviet Ukraine and link up with another ship continuing up the Danube into Austria. The complete voyage passes through seven countries, offering a rare chance to see something of Eastern Europe while enjoying the convenience of shipboard life and without coping with border crossings. Depending on which direction you're sailing, the total trip between Kiev and Vienna takes 13 or 14 days. You'll experience the simple and casual style of a Soviet river ship aboard the 300-passenger Akademik Viktor Gluschkov, and considerable luxury aboard the 212-passenger Austrian ship Mozart. It is possible to buy the Ukrainian portion only (10 or 11 days), including two added days in Moscow and one in Sofia, Bulgaria. The inaugural cruises are scheduled to sail from Kiev on October 19 and from Vienna on October 21. At the midway point-at Ruse, in Bulgaria passengers change ships to complete the journey. More cruises are planned for 1991. Last year, we had a preview of the Ukrainian segment of the cruise a comfortable way to sample the Dnieper River and the Black Sea. We found shipboard life informal, with few planned activities. Cabins-each with private bath, outside window, and convertible beds-are small and plainly furnished. While we weren't pampered, the crew was attentive and the ship spotless. Meals feature sturdy, flavorful Russian dishes; don't, however, expect the fresh produce and culinary variety found in the West. Going ashore The Soviet ship spends a day each in Kiev, Zaporozhye, Kherson, and Odessa, with a brief stop in Ismail.

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