Harvard Announces Participation in `Scholars at Risk Network'. (Noteworthy News)

Black Issues in Higher Education, August 1, 2002 | Go to article overview

Harvard Announces Participation in `Scholars at Risk Network'. (Noteworthy News)


CAMBRIDGE, MASS.

Harvard University President Lawrence H. Summers announced recently that Harvard University is participating in the "Scholars at Risk Network" and has selected its first two visiting fellows, Dr. Mehrangiz Kar and Dr. Wolde Mesfin, for the academic year 2002-03.

"In the 1930s, certain institutions stepped forward and made strenuous efforts to help at least some of the scholars who were threatened by Nazism. Not only were innocent lives saved, but also the institutions that hosted these refugee scholars were in many cases profoundly enriched, as was the scholarly community at large. Harvard is determined to be one of the leaders in the comparable effort in our own time," Summers says.

Kar, a distinguished legal scholar from Tehran, Iran, has been offered a fellowship at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and will come for the spring semester 2003. She will also have an affiliation with the Women's Studies Program, the Islamic Legal Studies Program and the Center for Middle East Studies. Kar's work focuses on questions of democracy and constitutional reform in Iran, and on dismantling legal barriers to women's and children's rights in particular. Kar has, as a result of this work, been arrested and imprisoned in Iran.

Mesfin has been offered a fellowship at the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for Afro-American Research in collaboration with the University Committee on Human Rights Studies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Harvard Announces Participation in `Scholars at Risk Network'. (Noteworthy News)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.