Pounds 400,000 Food for Thought Grants at Queen's; Safety Research Boost Will Aid Cross-Border Exchanges

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), August 17, 2002 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Pounds 400,000 Food for Thought Grants at Queen's; Safety Research Boost Will Aid Cross-Border Exchanges


FIVE research grants worth over pounds 400,000 have been awarded to Queen's University School of Agriculture and Food Science.

The Food Microbiology section of the school's Food Science department received the substantial awards from the Food Safety Promotion Board, an all-Ireland implementation body set up under the Belfast Agreement.

Won by open competition, the grants are to support collaborative food safety research amongst organisations on both sides of the border. The outcome of the projects, the university says, will not only significantly increase food safety knowledge but will also encourage technology transfer and co-operation amongst research organisations throughout Ireland.

Professor Arthur Gilmour, head of Food Microbiology, said: "The award of these grants recognises the excellence of food safety research carried out at Queen's. The wide-ranging nature of these projects indicates the breadth of expertise available within the School's Food Science Department.

"They represent a substantial addition to the range of projects currently being pursued by Food Microbiology which includes food spoilage, food processing, biotechnology as well as food safety."

Dr Karen King, Assistant Head of School, said: "We offer first-class teaching in our degree programmes, which is delivered by staff who are prominent in research both nationally and internationally. This means that the school provides its students with research-led teaching by experts who are at the forefront of their research areas."

The School of Agriculture and Food Science currently offers three food- related undergraduate honours degree courses: Food Science, Food & Nutrition and Microbiology.

With food manufacturers currently facing a serious skills shortage, employment opportunities are plentiful for graduates. Working in quality control, distribution, marketing, product development, research or production, graduates find employment with major food manufacturer/retailers, small to medium-sized food companies or research/government institutions.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Pounds 400,000 Food for Thought Grants at Queen's; Safety Research Boost Will Aid Cross-Border Exchanges
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?