LVF Boss Wright Demanded End to All Attacks on Catholic Churches

The People (London, England), August 25, 2002 | Go to article overview

LVF Boss Wright Demanded End to All Attacks on Catholic Churches


MURDERED LVF leader Billy Wright wrote of his 'abhorrence' of sectarian arson attacks on Catholic churches just months before he was shot dead, The People can reveal.

And the loyalist killer accused the security services of waging a dirty tricks campaign against him.

In a previously undisclosed letter, Wright, known as King Rat, denied he was in a leadership position of the loyalist terror group while a prisoner in Maghaberry or the Maze Prison.

The letter, discovered last week, states: "Having been a Christian for three and a half years I'm fully aware of the significance of the church and its buildings to one's faith.

"I condemn any attacks on church property just as I abhor interference in the worship of God by the blocking or re-routing of church parades."

Writing from his cell on H6 A Wing, in neat handwriting, Wright goes on to say in the five-page letter: "No I am not in a position of leadership in this organisation, neither am I in a position to influence it.

"I have been in solitary confinement since my incarceration with all my mail and telephone calls monitored plus strip-searched every time I left my cell, and baring (sic) in mind a prison officer was present during my visits it would be impossible to function in the manner suggested.

"It is my understanding that the LVF is a fully functioning paramilitary group with its own command structure."

On December 27 1997 INLA prisoner Christopher 'Crip' McWilliams shot Wright dead at the Maze Prison where he was serving an eight-year sentence for issuing threats to kill.

In his letter, Wright, 37, stated: "It is my understanding from speaking to people with an insight into the thinking of the LVF that it does not accept the political analysis given in relation to the purpose and direction of the Irish peace process by some leading loyalists. …

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