Such Nice Little Earners; Children with the Aah Factor Strike It Rich in Advertising

By Coleman, Alison | The Mail on Sunday (London, England), August 25, 2002 | Go to article overview

Such Nice Little Earners; Children with the Aah Factor Strike It Rich in Advertising


Coleman, Alison, The Mail on Sunday (London, England)


Byline: ALISON COLEMAN

TO have a child model in the family might seem like good fortune, but to have three can be extremely profitable. And for the Clarston family, modelling and earning money from it is a way of life.

Most of the modelling work for Mia-Jay, 10, Marni-Lee, 8, and three-yearold Milla-Star is for catalogues and brochures.

And demand can be high. 'Kids have the aahh factor,' explains Paul Grubb, creative director of advertising agency Duckworth, Finn, Grubb & Waters.

'Like kittens and puppies, little children are very cute and people respond to them in a positive way, so they are a valuable tool for advertisers.' And their appeal seems to rise above the ups and downs of the advertising industry as a whole.

The rest of the business has been in the doldrums for the past 12 months, but the demand for child models just keeps on growing.

Payment for photographic advertising work - for example, home shopping catalogues and supermarket magazines - is about pound sterling25 an hour, or pound sterling150 a day.

But break into television advertising and this could be as much as pound sterling300 a day or pound sterling3,000 per commercial.

There are costs involved in registering with an agency. Initially, a snapshot of the child is submitted. If accepted, there is usually an initial fee of about pound sterling80 to pound sterling90 to cover studio assessment and photographic work.

There may also be administrative charges for licensing and renewals, but they are usually deducted from the payment a child receives for assignments.

Agencies take a commission of about 20 per cent, though this can vary according to the type of work.

Payments are made directly to the child, so they must open their own savings account.

PHOTOGRAPHIC work pays less than television but there is more of it around.

For two hours' work on a catalogue shoot, a young model will get between pound sterling50 and pound sterling60, depending on age.

But the biggest-paying jobs are TV commercials, especially the long-running advertising campaigns such as the Standard Life insurance series that has followed the fortunes of James, Lucy and their parents for years.

Repeat fees for TV commercials are calculated as a multiple of the basic fee up to 400 or 500 per cent, which covers the use of the commercial for a year. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Such Nice Little Earners; Children with the Aah Factor Strike It Rich in Advertising
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.