Carnegie Mellon Collaborates with Minority-Serving Institutions on Internet Security. (Tech Talk)

By Roach, Ronald | Black Issues in Higher Education, August 15, 2002 | Go to article overview

Carnegie Mellon Collaborates with Minority-Serving Institutions on Internet Security. (Tech Talk)


Roach, Ronald, Black Issues in Higher Education


A collaboration between Carnegie Mellon University and minority-serving institutions may prove instrumental in preparing a generation of Black and Latino computer professionals who are highly skilled in Internet security.

This summer, the Pittsburgh-based research university began working with historically Black colleges and universities and Hispanic-serving institutions on an Internet security program. Carnegie Mellon's academic partners in the program, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), include Howard University, Morgan State University and the University of Texas at El Paso.

Carnegie Mellon is providing educational resources and instruction to prepare doctoral computer scientists to teach survey-level courses in information security to undergraduate and first-year graduate students at their universities.

A four-week program that ended August 2 was conducted by staff members of Carnegie Mellon's Software Engineering Institute (SEI) and its CERT Coordination Center, the nation's first and best-known computer emergency response team.

Other faculty members from Carnegie Mellon's H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management (Heinz School), School of Computer Science, and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering also participated in the course. Nine faculty members and officials from the three schools participated in the summer session at Carnegie Mellon, according to university officials.

Dr. Stephen E. Cross, director of the Software Engineering Institute, says the program is providing participants with the knowledge and expertise to develop and deliver curricula in information security, and should help increase the number of doctoral-level researchers in information security at historically Black colleges and universities and Hispanic-serving institutions.

"We are very excited to be partnering with these educational institutions," says Cross. "The training and experiences shared in this program lay the foundation to help create a new generation of Internet-security experts."

In Virginia, Hampton University officials and faculty members have been collaborating with information technology administrators and faculty members at James Madison University in Harrisonburg to develop Internet security studies curricula and degree programs for information technology students enrolled at Virginia institutions. …

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