Women in Black 2; It's Back - Just When You Thought It Was Safe to Ditch the Darkness

By Hayes, David | The Evening Standard (London, England), August 29, 2002 | Go to article overview

Women in Black 2; It's Back - Just When You Thought It Was Safe to Ditch the Darkness


Hayes, David, The Evening Standard (London, England)


Byline: DAVID HAYES

THERE is no clever way to put it, no way to avoid the clichEs.

After months of pretty florals, folksy prints and soft pastels, black is back. OK, for some of you it never went away, but for serious fashionistas the shade has been a no-go area not just this summer but for at least two years.

And you have Tom Ford - designer at Gucci and YSL - to thank for its return to the fashionable wardrobe.

The autumn catwalk shows were almost one long parade of shade. Gothic glamour at Gucci and bourgeois "Belle de Jour" posturing at Yves Saint Laurent were the best examples. So will dressing for the office be easier this season?

Anne Pitcher, buying director at Harvey Nichols, thinks so.

"Women always look sharper, more considered, more professional in black.

Eighty per cent of my own wardrobe is black," she says.

Gap PR director Anita Borzyszkowska is also a committed woman in black.

"I definitely feel more confident and self-assured in black. If I wear a black outfit I know I won't have to think about it for the rest of the day. …

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Women in Black 2; It's Back - Just When You Thought It Was Safe to Ditch the Darkness
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