It's Easy to Boycott Israeli and American Goods-But What about My Football Team? (Now What?)

By Booth, Lauren | New Statesman (1996), August 5, 2002 | Go to article overview

It's Easy to Boycott Israeli and American Goods-But What about My Football Team? (Now What?)


Booth, Lauren, New Statesman (1996)


Having shown no sign of possessing will-power since I reluctantly swapped nappies for knickers on my first day of school, I am finding this era of diets, boycotts, rehab and detox stressful. Recently, however, big "causes" -- rather than the threat of cancer and cirrhosis of the liver - have succeeded in improving my way of life. I have to thank the USA and Israel. (Wow, there's a phrase I didn't expect to be writing any time soon.)

Thanks to a personal antipathy for US super-corporations, and support for the Palestinian cause, my household has become a no-go area for American and Israeli goods. Boycotting Israeli produce is proving pretty easy: ever heard of anyone being addicted to olive oil or craving avocado pears (outside pregnancy)? Me neither. Some of the demands on the leaflet that warns "If you continue to buy them [the products below] you are buying bullets to kill children, women and innocent people in Palestine" are pretty hard-core, though, and actually take (gulp) an effort on my part to avoid.

Not shopping at Sainsbury's, Tesco, Safeway or Waitrose has made life interesting, but boycotting the hateful Marlboro brand means I'm really giving something up. But now, I have a boycott all of my own to put to the public, and the cause needs support from New Statesman football supporters.

Did you notice that two weeks ago, that loathsome bag of waste known as Lee Bowyer was about to be signed by Liverpool FC? Well, when I read this in the papers my first reaction was nausea. Why did it have to be my team, the team I've supported all my life, which proved once and for all that football is now all about money, money, money and has nothing whatever to do with the pride of the club or the will of the fans? Am I the only person in this country to find it sickening that a bully with a track record of drunkenness, greed and arrogance (and who, although cleared last year of beating an Asian student unconscious, was branded a liar by the judge and made to pay [pounds sterling]1m in costs) should have been offered [pounds sterling]35,000 a week to represent a multicultural city such as Liverpool, both at home and abroad? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

It's Easy to Boycott Israeli and American Goods-But What about My Football Team? (Now What?)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.