Scholarly Productivity Redefined in Counselor Education. (Professional Development)

By Ramsey, MaryLou; Cavallaro, Marion et al. | Counselor Education and Supervision, September 2002 | Go to article overview

Scholarly Productivity Redefined in Counselor Education. (Professional Development)


Ramsey, MaryLou, Cavallaro, Marion, Kiselica, Mark, Zila, Laurie, Counselor Education and Supervision


In this study, counselor educators responded to a survey about their scholarly productivity over a 3-year period. Their involvement in 7 scholarly activities is reported by category and by type of institution, tenure status, academic rank, and gender. Using a more comprehensive definition of scholarly productivity, this study documents that counselor educators are involved in a much broader, more diversified spectrum of scholarly activities than prior studies of scholarly productivity have indicated. Implications for tenure and promotion decisions, along with recommendations for training and mentoring of future counselor educators as well as future directions for research, are discussed.

**********

Boyer (1990) brought the issue of scholarly productivity to national prominence in the United States in Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Profession, his 1990 landmark report to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. In this report, Boyer stated that the most important obligation confronting this nation's colleges and universities was to recognize the full range of faculty talent and the great diversity of functions that higher education must perform. For U.S. higher education to remain vital, Boyer concluded that its institutions must define, in more creative ways, what it means to be a scholar. Rice (1991) concurred with Boyer and argued that the contemporary view of scholarship as synonymous with research is not only harmful to universities, faculty, and students but is also a relatively recent perspective that took shape after World War II and the passage of the G.I. Bill of Rights. According to Rice, as post-World War II veterans entered colleges and universities, the demand for faculty increased. As a result, the number of doctorate-granting programs with research as the core of their curriculum grew, and research became the standard for measuring faculty scholarship.

For U.S. education to remain vital now, Boyer (1990) and Rice (1991) concluded that its institutions must define in more creative ways what it means to be a scholar; these trendsetters are not alone in their view. In their survey of more than 23,000 research university faculty, chairs, deans, and administrators, Gray, Froh, and Diamond (1992) found strong agreement that research receives too much emphasis and teaching too little emphasis in higher education. Halpern et al. (1998) also reported widespread support for a multidimensional definition of scholarship reflected in the statements on scholarship by nine disciplinary and professional associations representing 14 academic disciplines that were part of a Syracuse University project that was designed to describe the scholarly and professional work of faculty in their fields.

In response to the need for a more representative definition of scholarly activities in higher education, Boyer (1990) and Halpern et al. (1998) have proposed adoption of a broader definition of scholarship that includes the following separate, yet overlapping, forms of scholarship: (a) original research/discovery, (b) integration (synthesis and reorganization) of knowledge, (c) application of knowledge, and (d) the scholarship of teaching and pedagogy. The repercussions of this redefinition of scholarship and the concomitant need for more appropriate ways of evaluating this type of scholarly productivity in higher education are far-reaching. Decisions on recruitment, reappointment, tenure, salary, and promotion are all influenced by scholarly productivity. Therefore, the ability to define and measure what constitutes scholarly productivity in one's discipline has been and continues to be a constant source of concern and debate in higher education (Hickson, Stacks, & Amsbary, 1992).

Reflective of this continuing academic debate, scholarly productivity in higher education has been studied in a number of ways and from many perspectives. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Scholarly Productivity Redefined in Counselor Education. (Professional Development)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.