'One-Party Campuses'; Survey: Vast Majority of College Professors Registered Democrats.(NATION)(CULTURE, ET CETERA)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 5, 2002 | Go to article overview

'One-Party Campuses'; Survey: Vast Majority of College Professors Registered Democrats.(NATION)(CULTURE, ET CETERA)


Byline: Ellen Sorokin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A majority of college professors across the country are registered Democrats, most of whom end up teaching in disciplines where politics matters the most, a new survey released by the Center for the Study of Popular Culture and the American Enterprise Institute shows.

More than 90 percent of the professors who work in the arts and sciences departments at schools like the University of Maryland, Brown, Cornell, Stanford, Penn State and Harvard belong to either Democratic, Green or Working Families parties, the survey found. Few faculty members are registered as Republicans or Libertarians.

"You can't get a good education if you only get half the story," said David Horowitz, author and editor of Frontpagemag.com, which has been following the issue of what he calls "one-party campuses" closely for several years.

"This is a national outrage. You could understand this taking place in the [former] Soviet Union, but you can't understand why this takes place in the United States. This is McCarthyism in the extreme."

However, some analysts argue that those who end up teaching politics don't like politics. "The problem here is not that these professors are perpetuating liberal political biases, but being anti-politics," said Thomas Mann, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, a liberal research and policy institute.

"Many of them teach that politicians are too consumed with being re-elected and forget about what the people want," he said.

The survey found:

*At the University of Maryland, of the 69 professors whose political affiliations were located, 59 were registered as Democrats and 10 as Republicans. Out of a sample of 37 sociology professors, 34 were Democrats. Of 20 political science professors, 17 were Democrats. Of 12 economics professors, eight were Democrats.

*At the University of Colorado at Boulder, 116 of the professors whose party registrations could be established were Democrats and five were Republicans. Out of a sample of 37 professors who teach English, none were Republicans. Out of a sample of 29 history professors, one was Republican. Out of 19 political science professors, two were Republican.

*At Brown University, 54 professors whose political affiliations showed up in primary registrations last year were Democrats, compared with three Republicans. Out of 10 English professors, none was Republican. Of 17 history professors, none was Republican. Out of seven political science professors, none was Republican. Of eight sociology professors, none was Republican. Out of six economics professors, one was Republican. Of nine engineering professors, two were Republican.

*At Harvard University, of the 52 professors whose affiliations were found, 50 were registered Democrats and two were Republicans. Of 15 sociology professors, none was Republicans. …

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