Want to Express Yourself? You Can in Art Therapy Class

By Rotstein, Natasha | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 2, 2002 | Go to article overview

Want to Express Yourself? You Can in Art Therapy Class


Rotstein, Natasha, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Natasha Rotstein Daily Herald Staff Writer

Students looking for a variety of expressive art therapy tools can now find what they need at Barat College of DePaul.

Located in Lake Forest, the college offers an interdisciplinary expressive art therapy curriculum that will expose students to different art therapies while giving them a core education in psychology.

Expressive art therapy includes drama, dance, movement, poetry and music and gives people non-traditional therapeutic outlets. For example, therapists can use these avenues as a way to get clients to express themselves.

Paul Hettich, who holds a doctorate and is a professor of Psychology at Barat, explained that the staff had been mulling over expanding the program for about five years.

"When DePaul came along two years ago they said, 'Yes, modify and expand your program,'" Hettich said. The alliance with DePaul allowed the department to develop the new interdisciplinary program which will prepare students for graduate school.

Over chips and blueberries, Hettich and Christine Anderson, who has a doctorate in Developmental Psychology, the two full-time staff members at the college, and Kris Eric Larsen, who has a master of Arts, and Terri Sweig, who has a doctorate in clinical psychology, and are adjunct professors at Barat eagerly spouted information about the program.

Barat teacher Ted Rubenstein, who has a master's in fine arts was not present.

The five professors are backed by a full staff within other departments as well.

"I look at this program as a choice program," Anderson said. "It allows students choices, I think that's part of its beauty. …

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