Launching Legacies: Take a Closer Look at the Art & Framing Council's New Charity Partner, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, and Its Rich Tradition of Helping Young Artists Succeed

By Pandolfi, Keith | Art Business News, September 2002 | Go to article overview

Launching Legacies: Take a Closer Look at the Art & Framing Council's New Charity Partner, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, and Its Rich Tradition of Helping Young Artists Succeed


Pandolfi, Keith, Art Business News


Last June, approximately 350 of the nation's best young writers and artists descended on Washington, D.C.'s John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts to receive recognition for their efforts at the 79th Scholastic Art & Writing Awards.

While the awards ceremony was meant to recognize the achievements of this year's winners, it also celebrated English and art teachers and served as a reminder to contestants' schools, families and communities that the arts remain a viable career choice.

Hosted by Rolling Stone Senior Editor and Film Critic Peter Travers, the event was attended by approximately 2,500 people and included an appearance by children's author and civil rights activist Ruby Bridges and Tony Award-nominated Broadway composer Elizabeth Swados. First Lady Laura Bush taped a special message to congratulate the award recipients.

As part of a low-key tribute to Sept. 11, the audience was shown a video titled "Art is Life," which focused on the importance of the creative spirit in recovering from tragic events.

"That was the sort of spirit with which we dedicated the ceremony this year," said BJ Adler, executive director of the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers, which administers the awards. "These guys were part of our recovery and part of our hope for the future."

Approximately 255 pieces of award-winning student artwork were featured at The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards National Exhibition of 2002, which took place at Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art, through July 15. Thanks to a new partnership with the Art & Framing Council, the art and framing industry will be a part of this exciting and prestigious program starting this fall.

An Established History

The Scholastic Awards were established in 1923 by Scholastic Inc. and are open to young artists, ages 12 to 18. Each year, more than 250,000 works of art and writing are submitted to 90 regional affiliate competitions across the country for consideration in 26 different categories.

This year, approximately 50,000 young artists and writers received honors from the regional programs. More than 25,000 finalists made it to the national level of judging. National honors were presented to 1,100 students who were selected by panel of jurors comprised of renowned artists, authors, educators and arts professionals.

Winners of the Scholastic Awards are in good company. Past winners have included such cultural icons as Andy Warhol, Joyce Carol Oates, Robert Redford, Richard Avedon and Sylvia Plath.

Adler said the Scholastic Awards are unique because of their long history and legacy. "M.R. Robinson, the founder of Scholastic, followed by his son, Dick, who is the current c.e.o., thought it was critically important to recognize and encourage creative development in American youth," she said." [The awards have] been a placeholder for these kinds of kids for 80 years."

The Scholastic Awards are also a way to recognize students whose talents often go unnoticed in this age of standardized testing and dwindling arts funding, Adler said. "There are many recognitions for athletics," she said, "but children learn in different ways. These kids have made a critical impact on many areas of the American psyche, culture and economy. These are the kids who have gone into communications, design and graphic arts. They really power the way we look at the world."

Boost of Confidence

One of this year's winners was Trinity High School (New York) graduate Ian Ferguson, who received a Gold Portfolio Award for his work in photography. After taking summer photography classes in Paris and at the Rhode Island School of Design, Ferguson developed an eye for high-impact images.

"I look for something graphic," said Ferguson, who has won Scholastic awards in both art and writing, "something with punch and some sort of tangible composition that really flows.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Launching Legacies: Take a Closer Look at the Art & Framing Council's New Charity Partner, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, and Its Rich Tradition of Helping Young Artists Succeed
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.