Reflections from a World Council of Churches' Consultation. (International and Global Inter-Religious Initiatives)

By Ucko, Hans | International Review of Mission, July 2002 | Go to article overview

Reflections from a World Council of Churches' Consultation. (International and Global Inter-Religious Initiatives)


Ucko, Hans, International Review of Mission


TAO FONG SHAN

HONG KONG

8-12 APRIL 2002

I. Introduction

Increasingly, communities of faith are being urged to support inter-religious initiatives that address social issues of common concern. International interfaith organizations seek the collaboration of national and international religious organizations in pursuing inter-religious initiatives around the globe. Civil fora call for the support of religious leaders. Governmental and intergovernmental institutions look to religious constituencies for leadership in providing moral education and social services.

At the same time, intolerance and conflict among religious and ethnic communities in many parts of the world are growing, and in more than one country violence is now justified in the name of religion. During this consultation, the news has been preoccupied with accounts of communal violence in India and the escalating violence in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and participants have mentioned continuing religious strife in the Sudan, Indonesia, Pakistan, and other countries.

The need for religious leaders and their constituencies to promote cooperation among diverse communities of faith has never been greater. Yet, a religious organization such as the World Council of Churches must also counsel its constituency to embrace initiatives that seem most likely to contribute to the peace and greater justice sought by all. Such counsel is especially relevant for the World Council of Churches, as many now consider what "ecumenism" should mean as churches face greater religious pluralism. A well-considered participation of the WCC in inter-religious initiatives is to the benefit of such endeavours.

Therefore, this international consultation, sponsored by the World Council of Churches and hosted by Areopagos at Tao Fong Shan in Hong Kong with Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim and Sikh participants, humbly offers the following reflections to churches and other communities of faith.

II. Clarification of Purposes

Inter-religious initiatives, which often speak of and promote "interfaith cooperation," have a wide variety of purposes, such as:

* Preventing the manipulation of religious principles for political purposes.

* Increasing tolerance, respect, and cooperation among different religious constituencies.

* Identifying and promoting spiritual values shared by religious traditions.

* Increasing appreciation of religious teachings among members of traditions of faith.

* Encouraging support for freedom of religion under international law.

* Supporting efforts for peace, reconciliation, justice and sustainable development.

* Mobilizing actions to prevent or curtail violence in the name of religion.

* Strengthening the social and legal institutions necessary for civil society.

* Advising the United Nations and engaging in and supporting, as appropriate, UN programs and initiatives.

* Presenting religious values in civil fora that address various social and economic concerns including hunger, poverty, refugees, environmental degradation, gender discrimination, etc.

* Preventing the manipulation of political power for religious purposes.

When considering involvement in an inter-religious initiative, the following questions deserve careful consideration:

* What are the particular purposes of a proposed inter-religious initiative?

* What activities are planned and how are the outcomes of these activities to be evaluated?

* What religious constituencies are to be involved?

* Who are the intended beneficiaries and what will be their expectations?

Culture, language, history, political and social circumstances, economic considerations, and the particular religious constituencies and leaders involved will shape the outcomes of any inter-religious initiative. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Reflections from a World Council of Churches' Consultation. (International and Global Inter-Religious Initiatives)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.