Good Rising from the horror.(COMMENTARY)

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 15, 2002 | Go to article overview

Good Rising from the horror.(COMMENTARY)


Byline: Rasheed Abou-Alsamh, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

One year after the tragic attacks on New York City and the Pentagon, it may come as a surprise to many Americans but in a strange way the attacks have brought good to Saudi Arabia and the rest of the Muslim world.

You wouldn't come to this conclusion if you focused on only one segment of the Saudi press devoted to bewailing the vicious American attacks on the kingdom and Islam in the press and on television. Read more closely, and you will find voices of moderation rising up and saying: "Enough is enough."

The horrific attacks by Mohamed Atta and the 14 other hijackers who were Saudis, have brought the whole Saudi nation to a crucial crossroads: Either keep ignoring the harm done to Islam and all Muslims by a minority of violent extremists or grasp this rare opportunity to take our society into a new direction, and also to explain the peacefulness and beauty of Islam to the whole world.

Unfortunately, most Saudis have not been in the habit of thinking for themselves, being analytical or being insightful. From an early age, Saudis are taught to memorize facts in school and not question authority or ask "what if?"

This has become a major stumbling block for our nation at this time when our oil wealth has been steadily decreasing since the peak of the 1980s. With an astronomical birthrate, Saudi Arabia is producing more and more people clamoring for jobs that are scarce. The fabulous wealth that oil brought us, and that has enabled us to develop spectacularly in the last 30 years, has also been a curse lulling too many of us into complacency.

This same complacency leads many of us to vehemently denying the criticism we hear of our society coming from America. But I think we are reacting so violently because the criticism is hitting home very hard. What many don't realize is that we have given foreigners the chance to criticize us because of the September 11 attacks on America. Before September 11, 2001, there was occasional grumbling about the way women are treated in the kingdom, but this didn't jeopardize our relations with the United States because the U.S. needed our oil and we had never attacked them.

Today it's a totally different story. Everything done or said by Saudis is now examined under a very strong microscope in the U.S.: The way we treat foreigners, our educational system and our form of governance are all being dissected and analyzed by angry Americans who want to know why the U.S. was attacked last year and what sort of society produced 15 of the 19 hijackers.

To overcome this immense crisis, one that the kingdom has never faced before, we must begin to right the wrongs in our society and also show the world our many positive attributes and achievements.

It will be a long and rocky road, but it is a journey we must undertake if we want to be proud once again of ourselves, and if we want to remain independent.

First, we must stop denying any of the hijackers were Saudis or even Arab. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Good Rising from the horror.(COMMENTARY)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.