UO Libraries Open Stacks for Public Use

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), September 2, 2002 | Go to article overview

UO Libraries Open Stacks for Public Use


Byline: JACK MORAN The Register-Guard

University of Oregon librarian Deborah Carver believes everyone should have a chance to take home resources from the school's libraries - a collection of more than 2.4 million books and countless other materials.

While university students and faculty members always have had free rein in the state's most extensive research libraries, Carver has worked for the past year to give that same access to other Oregon residents.

"There are a lot of people in Oregon who do not have any sort of access to a public library," Carver said. "By opening our stacks to Oregonians throughout the state, we're helping to empower the state's citizens while charting a course that we expect many of the state's other academic libraries will follow."

On Tuesday, Carver will oversee the first day of the university's "free-borrowing program."

Any Oregon resident age 18 or older will be able to use a current, bar-coded library card from any public library in the state to borrow materials from the Knight Library.

Card holders will also be able to borrow from the university's architectural and allied arts, mathematics, science and law libraries in Eugene, as well as the Lloyd and Dorothy Rippey Library at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology in Charleston.

"These are recognized as being among the best research libraries in the nation," Carver said. "While public library collections tend to be more popular in nature, the university libraries include more historic, scholarly and specialized information."

While new to Oregon, a couple of other campuses - including the University of Colorado and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - already have similar borrowing programs in place, Carver said. …

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UO Libraries Open Stacks for Public Use
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