Benefiting from a Virtual Visit of the Pope.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)

Manila Bulletin, September 19, 2002 | Go to article overview

Benefiting from a Virtual Visit of the Pope.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)


POPE John Paul II has done much to remind the Catholic laity that they serve the Church most in the ordinary work that they perform in their everyday lives and in the love and care they put into their married life and in the upbringing of their children. As we prepare for the World Family Congress scheduled for January 2003, let us remind ourselves of his teachings on human work and family life. We can compensate for his absence by immersing ourselves in his abundant teachings on these two important topics. The Pope can still be virtually with us in January 2003.

In his encyclical On Human Work, he said: "The Church is convinced that work is a fundamental dimension of man's existence on earth. She is confirmed in this conviction by considering the whole heritage of the many sciences devoted to man: anthropology, paleontology, history, sociology, psychology and so on; they all seem to bear witness to this reality in an irrefutable way. But the source of the Church's conviction is above all the revealed word of God, and therefore what is a conviction of the intellect is also a conviction of faith. The reason is that the Church-and it is worthwhile stating it at this point-believes in man: she thinks of man and addresses herself to him not only in the light of historical experience, not only with the aid of the many methods of scientific knowledge, but in the first place in the light of the revealed word of the living God. Relating herself to man, she seeks to express the eternal designs and transcendent destiny which the living God, the Creator and Redeemer, has linked with him.

The Church finds in the very first pages of the Book of Genesis the source of her conviction that work is a fundamental dimension of human existence on earth. An analysis of these texts makes us aware that they express-sometimes in an archaic way of manifesting thought-the fundamental truths about man, in the context of the mystery of creation itself. These truths are decisive for man from the very beginning, and at the same time they trace out the main lines of his earthly existence, both in the state of original justice and also after the breaking, caused by sin, of the Creator's original covenant with creation in man. When man, who had been created 'in the image of God male and female,' hears the words: 'Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth and subdue it,' even though these words do not refer directly and explicitly to work, beyond any doubt they indirectly indicate it as an activity for man to carry out in the world. Indeed, they show its very deepest essence. Man is the image of God partly through the mandate received from his Creator to subdue, to dominate, the earth. In carrying out this mandate, man, every human being, reflects the very action of the Creator of the universe.

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Benefiting from a Virtual Visit of the Pope.(Opinion &Amp; Editorial)
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