Heart Disease Claims Local Arts Philanthropist

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), September 17, 2002 | Go to article overview

Heart Disease Claims Local Arts Philanthropist


Byline: FRED CRAFTS The Register-Guard

Dan Pavillard of Eugene, one of Oregon's leading arts philanthropists, was remembered Monday as a passionate supporter of performing arts, an expert fund-raiser and a generous donor in his own right.

Pavillard, 69, died Friday night in his Eugene home from cardiac arrest brought on by congestive heart disease, which he had been battling for seven years.

"I've never met anybody who would put his energy and total resources - intellectual, physical - at risk and at work to the degree he did. There was no 90 percent from Dan; it was complete," said longtime friend Murry Sidlin, artistic director of the Cascade Music Festival and dean of the music school at Catholic University in Washington, D.C.

"The musical world will miss him because he was a model for others who may have felt that passion but didn't feel it was appropriate and possible to act in the way that he did," Sidlin said.

Although a man of limited means who lived modestly, Pavillard donated large portions of his small family inheritance to performing arts organizations, churches and universities across the nation. To him, a gift of $25,000 was a big sum.

Topping his contributions was the gift of an $86,200 Steinway grand piano to the Eugene Symphony Orchestra to use at concerts at the Hult Center for the Performing Arts. He also set up a piano maintenance fund, showed numerous performing arts organizations in other cities how to do a similar fund-raising project and made financial contributions to several arts projects.

A former music critic and arts administrator, Pavillard over the past decade gave his expertise pro bono to such organizations as the Oregon Bach Festival, Eugene Symphony Orchestra, American Symphony Orchestra League, Cascade Music Festival and Sunriver Music Festival.

He also worked on his own to further the careers of numerous musicians, particularly the Russian folk/classical ensemble Trio Voronezh and the Minnesota men's singing group Cantus, by arranging concert engagements and linking them with leading arts officials.

A gregarious soul, Pavillard was known to many in the arts community as having a larger-than-life personality that made him, at least in the eyes of former Eugene Symphony conductor Marin Alsop, "a lot of fun." Alsop was a particular favorite of Pavillard's, who often visited her at her concerts around the nation.

Libby Appel, executive director of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, said Pavillard was a man "who absolutely practiced what he preached. …

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