Finding out How We Buy Meat; RESEARCH: Shoppers Are Observed during the Decision-Making Process MLC View

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), September 17, 2002 | Go to article overview
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Finding out How We Buy Meat; RESEARCH: Shoppers Are Observed during the Decision-Making Process MLC View


Byline: Gwyn Howells

WHEN shopping for meat products, shoppers take an average of 30 seconds to make their selection.

This ranges from an average of 24 seconds to buy sausages up to 37 seconds for chops and steaks.

Looking at consumer behaviour is an intriguing and important part of our work at MLC and the above is just some of the findings of the research, which was done on our behalf by Taylor Nelson Sofres, (one of the world's leading market information groups), for our new report ``The Shopping Decision Tree''.

Over a period of several weeks, a team from Taylor Nelson Sofres observed and interviewed shoppers in the meat aisles of five of the UK's leading multiple grocers. Shoppers were observed during their decision-making process and subsequently interviewed about the reasons for making their selections - establishing a unique ``decision tree'' insight into consumer habits.

Consumers were found to clearly divide the meat category into two distinct groups - those products which form the core of everyday meal occasions (bacon, mince, sausage and sliced meat), or what the report calls ``Core Proteins''; and those meat products that are reserved for special/specific meal occasions (joints, chops, steaks and chilled ready meals), which the report calls ``Key Occasions''.

The report highlighted a num-ber of key behaviours to each consumer group. Those who saw meat as ``Core Protein'' perceived certain meat products as everyday meals. Furthermore, the purchase is highly planned but the occasion it is used for is not especially planned.

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