Perceptions of Intercultural Interaction and Communication Satisfaction: A Study on Initial Encounters

By Chen, Ling | Communication Reports, Summer 2002 | Go to article overview

Perceptions of Intercultural Interaction and Communication Satisfaction: A Study on Initial Encounters


Chen, Ling, Communication Reports


This project explored perceptions of intercultural interactions. Data were collected from U.S. undergraduate students shortly after they had a face-to-face, one-on-one conversation with an international student. A 15-item instrument was used to measure perceptions of the intercultural interaction. Study 1 included a principal components factor analysis and isolated three factors of perceptions of intercultural interaction: synchrony, difficulty, and common ground. Further, these dimensions were used to predict communication satisfaction. In Study 2, the factor structure was replicated and overall perceptions of intercultural interaction were found to be positively correlated with communication satisfaction. When used as predictors of communication satisfaction, the three factors combined to account for 70% of variance.

**********

* Intercultural communication competence has aroused great interest in scholars over the years (see Hannigan, 1990 for a review). However, there has been insufficient attention to empirical research (Dinges & Baldwin, 1996), especially with regard to effective intercultural communication. The present paper reports two studies and addresses an important aspect of the issue--the connection between perceptions of intercultural interaction and intercultural communication satisfaction. Communication satisfaction results from perceptions of intercultural interaction that are important to intercultural communication competence. Consequently, understanding the dimensions underlying perceptions of intercultural interaction is needed. Greater understanding of intercultural perception dimensions may inform the literature about key aspects of intercultural interaction relevant to intercultural competence.

Perceptions of Interaction

Intercultural communication literature has reported salient characteristics of face-to-face intercultural interactions. These characteristics have distinguished intercultural from intra-cultural interactions. It has been found, for example, that intercultural, in comparison to intra-cultural, interactions were perceived as giving rise to higher uncertainty (e.g., Gudykunst, 1983; Gudykunst, Chua, & Gray, 1987), higher anxiety (Stephan & Stephan, 1985) and lower quality of communication especially in initial encounters (Hubbert, Guerrero, & Gudykunst, 1999). These findings have uncovered aspects of communication that vary considerably from intracutural to intercultural settings and may represent areas in interaction adaptation for intercultural communication competence. It is therefore important to identify unique aspects of intercultural interaction that may help explain the variation in uncertainty, anxiety, and communication quality. Perceptions of communication capture the global impression participants have of their interaction and may include potentially unique factors that influence uncertainty, anxiety, communication quality, and, ultimately, communication competence in intercultural interactions.

Perceptions of communication have been commonly treated as an indication of the characteristics of communication in various relationships and are associated with variation in communication behaviors. Knapp, Ellis, and Williams (1980) generalize three dimensions of communication perceptions from reports of individuals about interactions in various (intracultural) interpersonal relationships. These communication perceptions include personalness, synchrony, and difficulty. Personalness is a function of relationship intimacy (or interpersonal distance) of the participants. Interaction participants in close personal relationships generally perceive a high degree of intimacy. Synchrony represents the smooth coordination of the interaction, which often is a function of mutual familiarity with each other's communicative pattern. Persons with a history of interaction with one another, or a similar sociocultural background, tend to perceive a higher degree of synchrony in their communication.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Perceptions of Intercultural Interaction and Communication Satisfaction: A Study on Initial Encounters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.