Archaeology Team Unearths Clues That Could Lead Them to . . .the Lost City of the Dead

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), September 25, 2002 | Go to article overview

Archaeology Team Unearths Clues That Could Lead Them to . . .the Lost City of the Dead


Byline: Claire Tolley

A DISCOVERY by Merseyside archaeologists has sparked hopes of finding an Egyptian city hidden for more than 4,000 years.

Dr Mark Collier and his team have returned from a study trip where they had hoped to update research on a southern Egyptian warlord's grave.

But when they began their investigations 20 miles south of Luxor, they unearthed a vast necropolis which could hold clues to the whereabouts of a lost city.

The team made the discovery in the village of Moalla two weeks ago after starting to examine inscriptions on a tomb belonging to the warlord Ankhtify.

Ankhtify ruled over much of Southern Egypt in 2,100 BC with his headquarters in the city of Hefat, which has remained hidden ever since.

French archeologists discovered his grave in the 1920s but rock falls over the centuries had covered much of the tomb with rubble and they did not spot signs pointing to a much larger ``city of the dead'' on the site.

It was the first excavation which Dr Collier, a lecturer at the University of Liverpool, has led.

He said: ``We thought it would be a nice relatively small project looking at producing a modern variation and plan of the inscriptions on the tomb.

``It has been transformed into what will be a radical new publication that will describe the tomb in its full setting.

``In his tomb Ankhtify mentions the city he rules from. It was normal for Egyptian tombs to be built near a city. Hefat has never been identified archeologically. People think they know roughly where it is but we don't even know which side of the Nile it is on.

``We would like to expand our work by drill coring to try and identify where the city is.

``It has turned out to be one of the largest tombs built at that time and if you assess Ankhtify in relation to his peers of the time then point-topoint he stands shoulder-toshoulder with anybody else.''

Ankhtify was one of a group of warlords who governed Egypt in the centuries after royal rule collapsed around 2,500 BC.

Pyramid burials were traditionally the preserve of kings but the inscriptions show how significant Ankhtify believed his rule to be.

Dr Collier, 40, who was born in Leigh, near Wigan, said: ``His tomb says `I am the beginning of men and the end of men, for no one like me will come again, nor could there be such a one; no one like me will be born again, nor could he be.' ``It's a clear statement of his power and importance. He was the most powerful warlord in the very south of Egypt at this time.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Archaeology Team Unearths Clues That Could Lead Them to . . .the Lost City of the Dead
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.