Portfolio Step to Certification

By Pugliese, Linda Lora | School Arts, October 2002 | Go to article overview

Portfolio Step to Certification


Pugliese, Linda Lora, School Arts


In this article, I will briefly outline what early and middle childhood educators might expect if they pursue National Board Certification.

The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) reliably identifies teachers who meet high and rigorous standards and communicate what accomplished teaching looks like. The National Board's requirements and standards grow out of its central policy statement, "What Teachers Should Know and Be Able to Do. This statement describes a vision of teaching based on five core propositions:

1. Teachers are committed to students and their learning.

2. Teachers know the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects to students.

3. Teachers are responsible for managing and monitoring student learning.

4. Teachers think systematically about their practice and learn from experience.

5. Teachers are members of learning communities.

The specific standards are built on the following eight foundation areas:

1. Goals and purposes of art education.

2. Knowledge of the students.

3. The content and teaching of art.

4. Learning environment.

5. Instructional resources.

6. Collaboration with colleagues.

7. Collaboration with families.

8. Reflections, assessments, and evaluation.

As a National Board Certified Teacher, I volunteered to pilot one of the portfolio entries for certification in Early Childhood and Middle Childhood/Art. In the pilot, I was asked to demonstrate how I plan and develop sequenced instruction to further student growth in art, as well as my understanding and attainment of broad educational goals.

The pilot entry I completed consisted of a written commentary, a student release form, a photo storyboard with twelve photographs taken during instruction, and a record of reflection for three days of teaching.

To start the pilot, I explained the program to my seventh-grade class, emphasizing that this assessment was not about them, but about my teaching. …

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