12 Directors and Designers Awarded NEA/TCG Grants. (News from TCG).(National Endowment of the Arts/Theater Communications Group)

American Theatre, October 2002 | Go to article overview

12 Directors and Designers Awarded NEA/TCG Grants. (News from TCG).(National Endowment of the Arts/Theater Communications Group)


Twelve early-career directors and designers have been selected for the NEA/TCG Career Development Programs for Directors and Designers, administered by TCG under a cooperative agreement with the National Endowment for the Arts. The programs are designed to benefit emerging artists with a strong commitment to a career in the not-forprofit professional theatre.

The NEA/TCG Career Development Programs for Directors and Designers provide direct support of $17,500 enabling early-career artists to expand their artistic boundaries and increase their knowledge of the field. Program activities may include travel, research, observing and assisting. Recipients may also direct or design projects with a designated mentor. Each program is hand-tailored to match the needs and goals of the recipient.

In response to the selection of the 12 recipients, TCG executive director Ben Cameron remarked, "TCG greatly appreciates the National Endowment for the Arts' continuous support of the NEA/TCG Career Development Program for both directors and designers. We are honored to administer a program that generously supports the needs of those who aspire to continue the legacy of American theatre."

Gigi Bolt, director of the theatre program for the National Endowment for the Arts added, "The Endowment congratulates the 12 gifted artists selected to participate in the 2002 NEA/TCG Career Development Program for Directors and Designers. Their passion, vision and commitment will help create and shape the theatre of the future. We are grateful to TCG for its superb stewardship and delighted to continue a partnership dedicated to nurturing our country's creative theatre artists."

The following directors are the recipients of support in 2002-2004:

* Jeremy B. Cohen has worked extensively in Chicago, where he is the artistic director of Naked Eye Theatre Company. His work has been seen at the Goodman Theatre, Bailiwick Repertory, Victory Gardens Theater and Steppenwolf Theatre Company in Illinois; at the McCarter Theatre in New Jersey; and at New York Theatre Workshop in New York.

* Ilesa Duncan has worked extensively in Chicago at Victory Gardens Theater, Pegasus Players, Chicago Theatre Company and Live Bait Theater. She trained as an actor at Victory Gardens Audition Studio and as a dancer at Joel Hall, Muntu Dance Theater and School of the Performing Arts Chicago.

* Kip Fagan is co-founder and co-artistic director of Printer's Devil Theatre, a Seattle-based company focusing on the development and production of innovative new work. His directing projects with Printer's Devil include: Welcome to KittyHawk, a new adapration of Chekhov's The Seagull and a multidisciplinary production of Naomi lizuka's Skin, staged in a hangar at the former Sand Point Naval Station. His directing work has also been seen at Empty Space Theatre and On the Boards in Seattle; Saint Martin's College in Olympia, Wash.; and Blue Barn Theatre in Omaha, Nebr.

* Frank Maugeri has worked extensively in Chicago, where he was artistic director of Theater DANK and where he is currently associate artistic director of Redmoon Theater. He has created and directed many site-specific works seen both in New York and Chicago, and has worked in Chicago at Trap Door Theater, Gnu Yak Theatre, Steppenwolf Theatre Company; and in New York at P.S. 122 and the Joseph Papp Public Theater as part of the Jim Henson Festival.

* Brooke O'Harra lives in Brooklyn, and her work has been seen in New York at La Mama Experimental Theatre Company, Vital Theatre Company, Manhattan Theatre Source and Hangar Theatre, and in Tokyo at Street Theater. She received her MFA from Tulane University in New Orleans.

* Steven Sapp of the Bronx is the founder of Live from the Edge Theatre and a co-founding member of The Point CDC and Universes, a New York--based theatre ensemble creating and producing theatre that combines poetry, spoken word and hip-hop culture.

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