Eighth Crime Congress Looks to 21st Century; International Criminal Court, New Convention Proposed

UN Chronicle, December 1990 | Go to article overview

Eighth Crime Congress Looks to 21st Century; International Criminal Court, New Convention Proposed


Eighth Crime Congress looks to 21st century

The Eighth United Nations Congress on the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders examined international co-operation in crime prevention and criminal justice for the twenty-first century during a two-week session held in Havana, Cuba, from 27 August to 7 September.

Adoption of draft model treaties on extradition, mutual assistance in criminal matters, transfer of proceedings, supervision of offenders and prevention of crimes against cultural property were among the many actions taken by the Congress, which met under the shadow of expected further rapid crime growth during the 1990s and beyond.

Eighty-one speakers addressed the Congress during a five-day general debate on crime prevention and criminal justice in the context of development--one of five major agenda items--held in plenary session.

The four other substantive items--imprisonment, juvenile delinquency, organized crime and terrorism, and UN norms and guidelines--were discussed in two main committees.

Some 1,400 participants from 127 countries, five intergovernmental and 40 non-governmental organizations attended the Congress. Since 1955, crime congresses have been held by the UN every five years.

Margaret J. Anstee, Secretary-General of the Congress and Director-General of the UN Office at Vienna (UNOV)--the seat of the UN Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Branch--at the final meeting said that the Congress had adopted more resolutions, recommendations, principles and model treaties--some 40 actions--than all prior Congresses put together.

Extensive preparations for the Congress, including a series of interregional and regional meetings, were carried out by the Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Branch of UNOV whose Chief, Eduardo Vetere, served as Executive Secretary of the Congress.

Juan Escalona Reguera, President of Cuba's National Assembly, was elected President of the Eighth Congress.

UN Secretary-General Javier Perez de Cuellar, in a message to the Congress on 27 August, said that crime had been transformed into a "global menace" by technological advances and the internationalization of many activities.

Fidel Castro Ruz, President of the Council of State and the Council of Ministers of Cuba, in an opening address, said crime and development were linked and that success in the fight against crime required international co-operation and commitment to the fight against poverty and marginalization.

Viable anti-crime action

In an effort to enhance the effectiveness of UN action in the crime field, the Congress asked the General Assembly to convene a ministerial meeting to decide on a viable future crime prevention and criminal justice programme and to consider the need for a convention to develop that programme. The Assembly was urged to establish an intergovernmental working group to elaborate proposals for the programme and suggest ways to implement it.

The Congress called on Member States to promote criminal sanctions against the dumping of hazardous wastes and consider enacting criminal legislation to protect persons threatened by the deterioration of the environment.

Member States were asked to develop policies to counter urban crime and develop economic policies to reduce crime by combating corruption, drug trafficking and other forms of exploitation.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Eighth Crime Congress Looks to 21st Century; International Criminal Court, New Convention Proposed
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.