Women Use Internet for Research, Not Play. (Online)

Marketing to Women: Addressing Women and Women's Sensibilities, October 2002 | Go to article overview

Women Use Internet for Research, Not Play. (Online)


Women are far more likely to use the Internet for research or information-gathering than for fun or entertainment, according to the Internet Research Group. More than half of online women (54%) log onto the Internet primarily to gather information or do research, while 11% go online mostly for entertainment.

Qualitative research indicates that women don't view the Web as an entertaining medium in the same they view TV or even print publications. When they go online women are likely to be seeking solutions to problems or tips that will make their lives easier. Many say they "don't have time" to read "puff pieces" on websites, including those designed for women, even though they don't express the same feelings about lighter fare on TV or in magazines.

When women shop online, their chief goals are to save time and money, and many are seeking specific product information rather than simply browsing. Nearly half of online women (47%) search for product reviews or recommendations on the Web.

Interestingly, despite women's complaints that they don't have time to read fluff online, a significant percentage read electronic newsletters from merchants (44%) and click on links e-mailed by merchants (30%). This suggests that informational online marketing maybe effective, even with women who feel pressed for time.

Women are more likely than men to gather health-related information online, according to a separate study by Datamonitor. …

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Women Use Internet for Research, Not Play. (Online)
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