Charles Warned: You're Making Deadly Enemies

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), September 26, 2002 | Go to article overview

Charles Warned: You're Making Deadly Enemies


Byline: RHODRI OWEN

THE Prince of Wales was warned last night he is courting disaster by getting involved in politics.

As he came under renewed attack for bombarding ministers with letters of complaint, he found strong support for his stand from countryside leaders in Wales.

But Harold Brooks-Baker, publishing director of aristocratic handbook Burke's Peerage, said Charles's controversial political interventions were making him dangerous enemies at Westminster.

Politicians who took exception to Charles's forthright stances on issues of the day, he warned, could move against him succeeding to the throne.

And, as if to prove the point, abolitionist Labour MPs yesterday joined in a chorus of condemnation of the Prince's actions, despite a spirited defence by St James's Palace.

``The Prince of Wales is in a very vulnerable position,'' warned Mr Brooks-Baker. ``I, like many other people happen to agree with the things that he says, but what we think does not matter.

``If he continues to push too hard he will come unstuck. The politicians will eventually say he is not suitable for the throne.''

Mr Brooks-Baker drew a parallel between Charles and his great-uncle, Edward VIII, who, he said, had also fallen foul of MPs.

``Edward VIII made comments about the poverty of Welsh miners that most people agreed with, but it angered politicians and it was that more than his problems with Mrs Simpson that brought about his abdication.

``The point is that the heir to the throne and the monarch should be able to make these sorts of comments but in doing so they leave themselves open to severe criticism from politicians.

``I hope Prince Charles can get away with it, but it is dangerous.''

Details of the Prince's private correspondence to senior political fig-ures were leaked to the press through an unnamed Whitehall source.

The Prince is said to have written to several members of the Government, including the Prime Minister, with complaints ranging from the situation in the countryside to his loathing of political correctness.

St James's Palace joined the fray yesterday by defending his behaviour as ``part of his role'' as heir to the throne. A spokeswoman said, ``It'spart of the Royal Family's role to highlight excellence, express commiseration and draw attention to issues on behalf of us all.

``The Prince of Wales takes an active interest in all aspects of British life and believes that as well as celebrating success, part of his role must be to highlight problems and represent views in danger of not being heard. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Charles Warned: You're Making Deadly Enemies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.